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How You Can Help Regenerate the Planet in 2019, Starting With Soil

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Adam Hester / Blend Images / Getty Images

The climate needs your help, the water needs your help, the land needs your help. In 2019 be part of the solution. The soil you walk on and grow food in holds a secret to some of the biggest problems facing the planet today.


Here are just some of the ways you can be part of the solution to regenerate the planet in 2019 and beyond, starting with soil:

1. Watch and share our new video.

Learn how to make 2019 the year you got involved in the movement to regenerate the planet. Watch the video below:

2. Compost at home.

Because food waste is food for the soil that grows your food! Learn more about how cool composting is via The Compost Story.

3. Grow your own food.

Learn how to create your own regenerative garden in your backyard. Check out the post below:

4. Become a Soil Advocate!

The next Kiss the Ground Soil Advocate Training begins on Jan. 15. Learn how to powerfully present the topics of soil health and regenerative agriculture as solutions to climate change, water scarcity and feeding the world.

5. Support a Farmer to be Trained in Regenerative Agriculture!

Our Farmland Program provides scholarships for producers to attend trainings and provides the technical support needed for them to successfully transition to soil focused regenerative agricultural management practices. For $5,500 you can fund the transition of a farm to one that regenerates land. This includes training, travel costs, consulting time, and soil testing. Learn more about our new Fund a Farmer Program.

6. Become a Kiss the Ground Member.

By becoming a member, your monthly donations make it possible for us to educate youth, consumers, and businesses, create media, train farmers, and advocate for healthy soils across the globe. In addition, members are granted access to resources and monthly member "Living Regeneratively" webinars designed to provide you with tools to help you explore regeneration in your own life, decolonize your mind, connect to nature, and become a steward of the planet. Learn more.

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