Quantcast

Reflections on Fukushima from Noam Chomsky to Ralph Nader and More

Energy

The news from Japan three years after Fukushima began its eruptions is simple: it's anything but over.

Three molten radioactive cores are still missing, four explosions have wracked the infrastracture, 300 tons of radioactive water pour daily into the sea, the improvised tank farm leaks and is running out of space, tens of thousands of spent fuel rods are strewn around the site, the mafia permeates the work force, tens of thousands of refugees grow more desperate every day, radioactive cesium is about to arrive on the west coast ... and much much more.

This year's anniversary drew some powerful reporting ... and, for some of us, a day with out food. Taken in sum, it seems even the corporate media will eventually be forced to deal with a disaster that threatens all life on Earth. Here are some of the top reports:

Karl Grossman, a top reporter on nuke issues for decades, exposes the "big lies" of a dying industry.

Michael Collins, who'll talk to Tuesday's Solartopia Green Power & Wellness show, reports from the California coast with a piercing, in-depth look at Fukushima's "Perfect Crime."

NBC pitches in with a devastating investigation of Japan's hugely corrupt "nuclear village."

Amy Goodman at Democracy Now! shows Noam Chomsky visiting a family in Japan:

Ralph Nader clarifies once again the "insanity" of atomic technology.

Former Nuclear Regulatory Commission Chair Gregory Jaczko makes it clear that the real lesson learned at Fukushima is that all reactors much shut.

Steve Hart's New Zealand radio show gives a full half-hour to the roots of the disaster.

From Fairewinds we learn about a whole generation of Japanese children who cannot play outside:

Arnie Gundersen also gives us a full report on the bleak state of a clean-up that will never end.

Gordon Edwards chimes in with a superb report on the state of the Fukushima Clean-up.

Michael Mariotte delivers the good news that Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick, a friend of Obama's, will push to shut the Pilgrim nuke.

Rianne Teule of Greenpeace warns us to "never forget." 

Nick Thabit compiles a menu of many of the commemorations that took place around the world.

And then the great Amory Lovins explains in just about an hour how the entire nation could (and must) "reinvent fire" for the conversion to renewable energy:

Above all we learn that because of Fukushima, all 54 of Japan's reactors remain shut. Worldwide, the nuclear industry is in a state of decay and collapse. Let's hope it doesn't come physically down on us before we get all the world's 400+ reactors finally shut down. Then we can look forward to a March 11, 2015 when we can breathe and swim without fear of fallout from so many reactors that should never have been built in the first place.

Visit EcoWatch’s FUKUSHIMA page for more related news on this topic.

---------

Harvey Wasserman edits nukefree.org and wrote SOLARTOPIA! OUR GREEN-POWERED EARTH.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Ryan Hagerty / USFWS

It's become a familiar story with the Trump administration: Scientists write a report that shows the administration's policies will cause environmental damage, then the administration buries the report and fires the scientists.

Read More Show Less
Valerie / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

A coalition of some of the largest environmental groups in the country joined forces to file a lawsuit in federal court challenging the Trump administration's maneuver to weaken the Endangered Species Act.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
beyond foto / Getty Images

By Kimberly Holland

Children who eat a lot of gluten in their earliest years may have an increased risk of developing celiac disease and gluten intolerance, according to a new study published in JAMATrusted Source.

Read More Show Less
Joe Raedle / Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

Calling the global climate crisis both the greatest threat facing the U.S. and the greatest opportunity for transformative change, Sen. Bernie Sanders unveiled today a comprehensive Green New Deal proposal that would transition the U.S. economy to 100 percent renewable energy and create 20 million well-paying union jobs over a decade.

Read More Show Less
orientalizing / Flickr

The Parties to CITES agreed to list giraffes on Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) today at the World Wildlife Conference or CoP18 in Geneva. Such protections will ensure that all giraffe parts trade were legally acquired and not sourced from the poached giraffes trade and will require countries to make non-detriment findings before allowing giraffe exports. The listing will also enable the collection of international trade data for giraffes that might justify greater protections at both CITES and other venues in the future.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

The WHO stressed that more research is needed on the potential health risks of microplastic ingestion. luchschen / iStock / Getty Images Plus

The UN's health agency on Thursday said that microplastics contained in drinking water posed a "low" risk at their current levels.

However, the World Health Organization (WHO) — in its first report on the potential health risks of microplastic ingestion — also stressed more research was needed to reassure consumers.

Read More Show Less

Brazil's right-wing President Jair Bolsonaro is giving President Trump a run for his money in the alternative facts department.

Read More Show Less
Washington Gov. Jay Inslee delivered his 2019 State of the State address on Jan. 15. Governor Jay and First Lady Trudi Inslee / Flickr

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, who made solving the climate crisis the center of his presidential campaign, is dropping out of the 2020 Democratic primary race.

Read More Show Less