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Reducing Toxic Chemicals in Your Home

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Reducing Toxic Chemicals in Your Home

Too many homes are full of icky products with toxic chemicals that can be hazardous to our health and the health of the planet.

Maybe you're constantly wondering what chemicals are in the products that you put on your body or use in your home. Or how to decode those long ingredient lists. Or, most important, why you should have to figure out what's safe to use in the first place!

My friend Bev Thorpe wondered all those things—which inspired her to dedicate her life to reducing chemical pollution at its source by helping companies make safer, non-toxic products. 

In the latest installment of The Good Stuff, our monthly podcast, you can listen in on a recent conversation I had with Bev about her work to promote "green chemistry."

Over the past year, The Good Stuff has highlighted solutionaries from around the world: Girl Scouts stepping up to save orangutans from habitat destruction, cooperative worker-owners making business more democratic and kids fighting for more eco-friendly food packaging.

Like all the others, this one's a must-hear. So have a listen or download it for later. Either way, I hope you enjoy this episode of The Good Stuff!

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My journey to becoming an activist began in late 2018. During a trip to California to visit family, the Camp Fire broke out. At the time, it was the most devastating and destructive wildfire in California history. Thousands of acres and structures burned, and many lives were lost. Since then, California's wildfires have accelerated: This past year, we saw the first-ever "gigafire," and by the end of 2020, more than four million acres had burned.

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