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Reducing Toxic Chemicals in Your Home

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Reducing Toxic Chemicals in Your Home

Too many homes are full of icky products with toxic chemicals that can be hazardous to our health and the health of the planet.

Maybe you're constantly wondering what chemicals are in the products that you put on your body or use in your home. Or how to decode those long ingredient lists. Or, most important, why you should have to figure out what's safe to use in the first place!

My friend Bev Thorpe wondered all those things—which inspired her to dedicate her life to reducing chemical pollution at its source by helping companies make safer, non-toxic products. 

In the latest installment of The Good Stuff, our monthly podcast, you can listen in on a recent conversation I had with Bev about her work to promote "green chemistry."

Over the past year, The Good Stuff has highlighted solutionaries from around the world: Girl Scouts stepping up to save orangutans from habitat destruction, cooperative worker-owners making business more democratic and kids fighting for more eco-friendly food packaging.

Like all the others, this one's a must-hear. So have a listen or download it for later. Either way, I hope you enjoy this episode of The Good Stuff!

David Attenborough narrates "The Year Earth Changed," premiering globally April 16 on Apple TV+. Apple

Next week marks the second Earth Day of the coronavirus pandemic. While a year of lockdowns and travel restrictions has limited our ability to explore the natural world and gather with others for its defense, it is still possible to experience the wonder and inspiration from the safety of your home.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Michael Svoboda

For April's bookshelf we take a cue from Earth Day and step back to look at the bigger picture. It wasn't climate change that motivated people to attend the teach-ins and protests that marked that first observance in 1970; it was pollution, the destruction of wild lands and habitats, and the consequent deaths of species.

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An Amazon.com Inc. worker walks past a row of vans outside a distribution facility on Feb. 2, 2021 in Hawthorne, California. PATRICK T. FALLON / AFP via Getty Images

Over the past year, Amazon has significantly expanded its warehouses in Southern California, employing residents in communities that have suffered from high unemployment rates, The Guardian reports. But a new report shows the negative environmental impacts of the boom, highlighting its impact on low-income communities of color across Southern California.

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Xiulin Ruan, a Purdue University professor of mechanical engineering, holds up his lab's sample of the whitest paint on record. Purdue University / Jared Pike

Scientists at the University of Purdue have developed the whitest and coolest paint on record.

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Less than three years after California governor Jerry Brown said the state would launch "our own damn satellite" to track pollution in the face of the Trump administration's climate denial, California, NASA, and a constellation of private companies, nonprofits, and foundations are teaming up to do just that.

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