Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Record Wind Power Generation in Spain

Energy
Record Wind Power Generation in Spain

Greenpeace UK

On a windy night in September, whilst most people were sleeping, wind power reached a record of 64.2 percent of Spain’s electricity demand.

The vast majority of Spain's power that night came not from fossil fuels but clean, renewable energy generated by wind turbines on the Spanish hills.

And what couldn't be used in Spain wasn't wasted.

Some was exported via giant cables linking Spain to the rest of Europe and some was used to pump water uphill so it could be allowed to flow back down later, when demand was higher.

Pumped storage and interconnectors are just two of the ways Spain has found to make sure wind works. 

And it wasn't just one night.

During September Spanish tubines generated so much wind power that coal use in Spain crashed, reducing emissions from fossil fuels.

But Spain isn't even the windiest country in Europe.

The UK could generate far more power from on and offshore wind than Spain does.

Last month we got our own record. On Sept. 14 wind accounted for 10 percent of electricity use.

We could do so much more.

If Spain can make a serious transition to renewables, which now generate almost a third of their electricity, then why can’t the UK?

Visit EcoWatch’s RENEWABLES page for more related news on this topic.

 

Susanna Pershern / Submerged Resources Center/ National Park Service / public domain

By Melissa Gaskill

Two decades ago scientists and volunteers along the Virginia coast started tossing seagrass seeds into barren seaside lagoons. Disease and an intense hurricane had wiped out the plants in the 1930s, and no nearby meadows could serve as a naturally dispersing source of seeds to bring them back.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Fridays for Future climate activists demonstrate in Bonn, Germany on Sept. 25, 2020. Roberto Pfeil / picture alliance via Getty Images

Carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere hit a new record in 2019 and have continued climbing this year, despite lockdowns and other measures to curb the pandemic, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) said on Monday, citing preliminary data.

Read More Show Less

Trending

The Argentine black-and-white tegu is an invasive species that can reach four-feet long. Mark Newman / Getty Images

These black-and-white lizards could be the punchline of a joke, except the situation is no laughing matter.

Read More Show Less
Smoke covers the skies over downtown Portland, Oregon, on Sept. 9, 2020. Diego Diaz / Icon Sportswire

By Isabella Garcia

September in Portland, Oregon, usually brings a slight chill to the air and an orange tinge to the leaves. This year, it brought smoke so thick it burned your throat and made your eyes strain to see more than 20 feet in front of you.

Read More Show Less
A rare rusty-spotted cat is spotted in the wild in 2015. David V. Raju / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 4.0

Misunderstanding the needs of how to protect three rare cat species in Southeast Asia may be a driving factor in their extinction, according to a recent study.

Read More Show Less