Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Record-Setting Indiegogo Campaign at $4.7 Million Takes Honeybee Entrepreneurs to New Heights

Food

Last week EcoWatch reported on the incredible success of father and son beekeepers from Bryon Bay, Australia—Stuart and Cedar Anderson—whose Indiegogo campaign crowdsourced $2 million on its first day in support of their revolutionary honey harvesting beehive system, Flow.

As of this morning, the duo team has raised more than $4.7 million and they still has 32 days left in the campaign!

Cedar and Stuart Anderson share their excitement at the low-fuss system of honey-harvesting they invented. Photo credit: Flow

The Flow Hive indiegogo campaign is now the most successful crowdfunding venture ever launched outside the U.S. In dollar value, the U.S. has made by far the biggest contribution (around $2.5 million), with Australia having pledged $1.76 million, followed by Canada and the UK. On the bottom end of the scale Ukraine has come through with one dollar, two dollars each from Estonia and Serbia, and a crisp fiver from Rwanda.

"The response has been simply amazing. Its gone far beyond anything we would have imagined," said co-inventor Cedar Anderson. "It's gratifying and humbling to see so much support for Flow Hive, but ultimately I just love that what it's really showing is support for bees. It's so exciting!"

Right now we're all working very hard to fulfill our pledges to our Indiegogo supporters by manufacturing the Flow Hives and Flow Frames and bringing them to the world," said co-inventor Stuart Anderson. Photo credit: Flow

The Andersons have developed what they call the "beekeepers dream." It's a revolutionary beehive invention that allows beekeepers to harvest honey without opening the hive, which makes it much easier for people and reduces disturbance and stress on the bees. The invention allows you to enjoy fresh honey straight out of the beehive without opening it.

When asked if the huge success of the Indiegogo campaign has changed their plans, father and co-inventor Stuart Anderson replied, "The plan remains the same—only the scale has changed. Right now we're all working very hard to fulfill our pledges to our Indiegogo supporters by manufacturing the Flow Hives and Flow Frames and bringing them to the world. That is paramount for us right now and we're happy to report that the wheels are in motion and we are 100 percent certain that we will deliver."

I don't think stories get better than this.

In case you haven't seen the great promo video about the Anderson's company and campaign, watch here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Innovative Startup Sells Coffee Grounds to Fuel Cars and Power Buildings

Watch Portlandia’s Hilarious Take on Life Inside a Tiny House

3 Young Entrepreneurs Find Revolutionary Way to Cut Out Food Waste

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

polaristest / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner

Over six gallons of water are required to produce one gallon of wine. "Irrigation, sprays, and frost protection all [used in winemaking] require a lot of water," explained winemaker and sommelier Keith Wallace, who's also a professor and the founder of the Wine School of Philadelphia, the largest independent wine school in the U.S. And water waste is just the start of the climate-ruining inefficiencies commonplace in the wine industry. Sustainably speaking, climate change could be problematic for your favorite glass of wine.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Spinach is a true nutritional powerhouse, as it's rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Jeff Turrentine

From day to day, our public health infrastructure — the people and systems we've put in place to keep populations, as opposed to individuals, healthy — largely goes unnoticed. That's because when it's working well, its success takes the form of utter normalcy.

Read More Show Less
Spring Break vs. COVID19: The Real Impact of Ignoring Social Distancing

By Eoin Higgins

A viral video showing cell phone data collected by location accuracy company X-Mode from spring break partiers potentially spreading the coronavirus around the U.S. has brought up questions of digital privacy even as it shows convincingly the importance of staying home to defeat the disease.

Read More Show Less
Aerial shot top view Garbage trucks unload garbage to a recycle in the vicinity of the city of Bangkok, Thailand. bugto / Moment / Getty Images

German researchers have identified a strain of bacterium that not only breaks down toxic plastic, but also uses it as food to fuel the process, according to The Guardian.

Read More Show Less