Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Reality Drop: A New Way to Fight Climate Denial

Climate

The Climate Reality Project

By Maggie L. Fox

After the hottest year on record in the continental U.S. in 2012, coupled with a number of devastating dirty weather events, it’s become increasingly clear we are living with the impacts of carbon pollution and a warming climate, and the polls show it. Yet despite this reality, climate deniers continue to dig in. A recent journalistic exposé found that wealthy, anonymous donors have funneled yet more money—$120 million— in recent years to groups that deny climate change and block efforts to solve it.

That’s why we’re introducing Reality Drop, an interactive online tool designed to change the conversation around climate change.

Here’s how Reality Drop works. We start with an online library of more than a hundred of the most common climate change myths deniers try to propagate—the same myths you might read in news stories, online comment threads, hear on talk radio, or even run across in your community or workplace. For each one, Reality Drop offers a simple, succinct rebuttal, grounded in the most up-to-date climate science—without an attitude. It’s just the facts, but easy to understand and share, no matter who you’re talking to.

So take a look—it’s a very exciting tool build to help all of us change the climate conversation and turn denial to action.

Each day, we feature a roundup of climate news from around the world that demands a response. Some articles may contain misleading quotes from a climate denier. And in other cases, distortions of the truth are polluting the comment section. Reality Drop matches each article with the appropriate climate fact. To respond, you simply go to the article, take the response from Reality Drop, and put it into your own words. In only a minute, you’ve helped change the conversation.

It’s time to counter the well-funded denial machine with facts. We shouldn’t give the deniers any more attention than they deserve. But we can’t ignore them either. Together, we need to speak up, engage both online and offline, and use our voices to demand that our leaders face the reality of climate change and embrace the opportunity for action.

Visit EcoWatch’s CLIMATE CHANGE page for more related news on this topic.

——–

Click here to tell Congress to Expedite Renewable Energy.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

polaristest / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner

Over six gallons of water are required to produce one gallon of wine. "Irrigation, sprays, and frost protection all [used in winemaking] require a lot of water," explained winemaker and sommelier Keith Wallace, who's also a professor and the founder of the Wine School of Philadelphia, the largest independent wine school in the U.S. And water waste is just the start of the climate-ruining inefficiencies commonplace in the wine industry. Sustainably speaking, climate change could be problematic for your favorite glass of wine.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Spinach is a true nutritional powerhouse, as it's rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pexels

By Jeff Turrentine

From day to day, our public health infrastructure — the people and systems we've put in place to keep populations, as opposed to individuals, healthy — largely goes unnoticed. That's because when it's working well, its success takes the form of utter normalcy.

Read More Show Less
Spring Break vs. COVID19: The Real Impact of Ignoring Social Distancing

By Eoin Higgins

A viral video showing cell phone data collected by location accuracy company X-Mode from spring break partiers potentially spreading the coronavirus around the U.S. has brought up questions of digital privacy even as it shows convincingly the importance of staying home to defeat the disease.

Read More Show Less
Aerial shot top view Garbage trucks unload garbage to a recycle in the vicinity of the city of Bangkok, Thailand. bugto / Moment / Getty Images

German researchers have identified a strain of bacterium that not only breaks down toxic plastic, but also uses it as food to fuel the process, according to The Guardian.

Read More Show Less