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Rally Today to Save Ison Rock Ridge from Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining

Energy

Appalachian Voices

Join us Nov. 16 as we gather in Washington, D.C. in front of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) headquarters alongside community members from Wise County, Virginia to ask the EPA to Keep Ison Rock Ridge standing and reject a permit for mountaintop removal coal mining.

The Wise Energy Coalition is teaming up with Greater Washington Interfaith Power and Light and other local organizations to bring a few hundred people to the doorstep of the EPA. The EPA’s authority is all that stands in the way of blasting on Ison Rock Ridge, but the agency has indicated that it is considering allowing the mountaintop removal permit to move forward.

The rally is from Noon to 1 p.m. at 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, at the Federal Triangle Metro station on the Orange and Blue lines.

In Wise County, Virginia, a mountain known as Ison Rock Ridge is slated to be destroyed by a 1,200 acre mountaintop removal coal mine. Ison Rock Ridge sits above five small communities made up of 1,800 people. If the permit is approved, the quality of life for these people would effectively be destroyed.

The proposed mountaintop removal permit boundary calls for mining 300 feet from some community members’ homes as well as burying headwater streams that feed the creeks running through their communities.

Your efforts have held this permit at bay for years, but now the EPA is close to making a final decision and the state is siding with the coal companies. We need to make our voices heard louder than ever by showing up at their doorstep and demanding justice. Click here to learn more about Ison Rock Ridge.

Join us today to help bring awareness to the issue and, ultimately, to keep Ison Rock Ridge standing.

If you can't make it to D.C. for the rally, then click here and add your voice by letting EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson and the Obama administration know that Ison Rock Ridge should be protected. Click here.

For more information, click here.

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