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Ragú Sauces Recalled Over Potential Plastic Contamination

Food
Ragú Old World Style Traditional is one of three flavors named in a voluntary recall. Mike Mozart / CC BY 2.0

Spaghetti with plastic sauce? That's what you might be eating if you pour one of three flavors of Ragú sauce over your pasta.

Mizkan America, the food company that owns Ragú, announced Saturday that it was voluntarily recalling some Chunky Tomato Garlic & Onion, Old World Style Traditional and Old World Style Meat sauces because they might be contaminated with plastic fragments, The Today Show reported.


"Mizkan America is taking this action out of an abundance of caution," the company wrote in a press release. "This recall is at the retail level and all impacted retailer customers have been notified of this voluntary recall prior to this press release."

The company said that no one had complained or reported injuries, and urged customers to check their kitchens for the recalled products.

"Mizkan America also asks consumers to examine their refrigerator and pantry inventory for the specific jars affected by this recall. Any recalled sauce should be discarded and not consumed," the company advised.

The affected sauces were produced between June 4 and 8. The details of the products are as follows:

Ragú® Chunky Tomato Garlic & Onion, 45 oz.
Flavor description: Ragú® Chunky Tomato Garlic & Onion
Cap code: JUN0620YU2
Best Use By Date: JUN0620YU2

Ragú® Chunky Tomato Garlic & Onion, 66 oz.
Flavor Description: Ragú® Chunky Tomato Garlic & Onion
Cap code: JUN0520YU2
Best Use by Date: JUN0520YU2

Ragú® Chunky Tomato Garlic & Onion, 66 oz.
Flavor Description: Ragú® Chunky Tomato Garlic & Onion
Cap code: JUN0620YU2
Best Use By Date: JUN0620YU2

Ragú® Old World Style Traditional, 66 oz.
Flavor description: Ragú® Old World Style Traditional
Cap code: JUN0420YU2
Best Use By Date: JUN0420YU2

Ragú® Old World Style Meat, 66 oz.
Flavor description: Ragú® Old World Style Meat
Cap code: JUN0520YU2
Best Use By Date: JUN0520YU2

"Consumers who have purchased the recalled Ragú® sauces with the outlined cap codes should call our Customer-Service Hotline to receive a replacement," Mizkan wrote.

The hotline number is 800-328-7248.

The recall comes about a week after Tyson Foods recalled around 190,757 pounds of chicken fritters because of possible plastic contamination.

Recalls were also issued for Pillsbury and King Arthur flour last week due to an ongoing E. coli outbreak, The Today Show further reported.

More than 14,000 cases of King Arthur Five-Pound Unbleached All-Purpose Flour were recalled June 13, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The next day, Hometown Food Company recalled two lot codes of its Pillsbury® Best Five-Pound Bread Flour, also due to E. coli risk, The FDA announced. The outbreak has sickened 17 people in eight states and sent three to the hospital, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. ALDI Baker's Corner All Purpose Flour is also implicated; the company issued a recall of five-pound bags in May.

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