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Public Library Hijacked for Fracking Industry Propaganda

Fracking

EcoWatch

[Editor's note: I received a phone call from an Ohio resident this week who was upset after receiving the Stark County District Library upcoming events newsletter because it listed two events promoting the natural gas industry. I encouraged her to email me about her concerns. Below is what she sent and her call to action, encouraging concerned citizens to contact the Stark County District Library.]

I recently received the newsletter of the Stark County District Library and as I was glancing over their summer offerings, I was disturbed to see that two of the upcoming programs were titled Oil and Gas in Stark County presented by the Stark Development Board and Chesapeake Energy on Wednesday, June 27, as well as Guide to Oil and Gas Fracking presented by Michael Gruber of the Stark County Association of Realtors on Monday, July 16.

I find it appalling that our public dollars are being used to promote the oil and gas industry. Furthermore, since the topic is being presented by the fracking industry and the library makes no mention of inviting advocates with a differing perspective, there will be few if any opportunities to explore alternative views or for the information to be presented in an unbiased manner. I find this incongruous with the library's mission of "Inspiring Ideas, Enriching Lives, Creating Community" in addition to their core values of "Service Excellence, Intellectual Freedom, Respect for Each Individual and Openness to Change," which are featured prominently on the library's website.

I intend to write to the director to express my concerns. I am hopeful that others who share these concerns will also make their views known.

Thank you.

A Concerned Citizen of Stark County

[Here's contact for the executive director of the Stark County District Library, Karen E. Miller, 330-458-2833, kmiller@starklibrary.org. The mailing address for the library is 715 Market Ave., N. Canton, Ohio 44702]

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 

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