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Public Lands, Private Profits

Energy

Center for American Progress

Federal public lands are managed by the government on behalf of all Americans. Some of our public lands are appropriate for energy production and other industrial development, but others should instead be prioritized for values like recreation, hunting and fishing, clean air, clean drinking water and their role in our quality of life.

On July 11, Center for American Progress in partnership with the Sierra Club will premiere Public Lands, Private Profits, a series of mini-documentaries about three areas held in the public trust that raise questions about where industrial development of our lands may take place, and where it is not appropriate. Grand Canyon National Park, Bryce Canyon National Park and the Bridger-Teton National Forest may all be irrevocably changed if various companies’ plans to move forward with their extraction projects are approved.

Watch a preview of the video series below:

 

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The Center for American Progress is a nonpartisan research and educational institute dedicated to promoting a strong, just and free America that ensures opportunity for all. We believe that Americans are bound together by a common commitment to these values and we aspire to ensure that our national policies reflect these values. We work to find progressive and pragmatic solutions to significant domestic and international problems and develop policy proposals that foster a government that is "of the people, by the people, and for the people.

 Visit EcoWatch’s ENERGY page for more related news on this topic.

 

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