Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Protections Finalized for 132 Caribbean Fish Species

Pew Charitable Trusts

Holly Binns, a project director for the Pew Environment Group, issued the following statement in response to the U.S. Department of Commerce’s final approval of plans to prevent overfishing of 132 species by setting science-based catch limits. The Caribbean Fishery Management Council gave initial approval in August.

These plans mark a major milestone in the decades-long effort to end overfishing of dozens of depleted species. The new rules will serve two purposes—help dwindling species recover, and assist in preventing overfishing from occurring by protecting relatively healthy species now before they potentially plummet to critically low levels. For the first time, fishery managers have the tools to more easily spot declines in fish populations and take action quickly to avoid reaching a crisis. This proactive approach should help reduce the establishment of severe fishing restrictions that become necessary when species are depleted.

“The new catch limits are reasonable and based on sound scientific recommendations. There is still much work to be done, however, to ensure that the new system is effective and limits are enforced. Overall, in a region where overfishing has taken a severe toll, these plans blaze a new path in managing fish that are vital for a healthy ocean ecosystem and coastal economy.”

Background

These plans are formally known as the Comprehensive Annual Catch Limits Amendments. They were originally approved by the Caribbean Fishery Management Council in September 2010 and August 2011. The U.S. Secretary of Commerce has the final say in setting regional fishery policies. The plans cover 132 species ranging from Nassau grouper and parrotfish to angel fish and queen conch. The rules become effective Jan. 29, 2012.

For more details, download our fact sheet.

For more information, click here.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The CDC has emphasized that washing hands with soap and water is one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Guido Mieth / Moment / Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control has emphasized that washing hands with soap and water is one of the most effective measures we can take in preventing the spread of COVID-19. However, millions of Americans in some of the most vulnerable communities face the prospect of having their water shut off during the lockdowns, according to The Guardian.

Read More Show Less
A California newt (Taricha torosa) from Napa County, California, USA. Connor Long / CC BY-SA 3.0

Aerial photos of the Sierra Nevada — the long mountain range stretching down the spine of California — showed rust-colored swathes following the state's record-breaking five-year drought that ended in 2016. The 100 million dead trees were one of the most visible examples of the ecological toll the drought had wrought.

Now, a few years later, we're starting to learn about how smaller, less noticeable species were affected.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Disinfectants and cleaners claiming to sanitize against the novel coronavirus have started to flood the market.
Natthawat / Moment / Getty Images

Disinfectants and cleaners claiming to sanitize against the novel coronavirus have started to flood the market, raising concerns for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which threatened legal recourse against retailers selling unregistered products, according to The New York Times.

Read More Show Less
A customer packs groceries in reusable bags at a NYC supermarket on March 1, 2020. Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images

The global coronavirus pandemic has thrown our daily routine into disarray. Billions are housebound, social contact is off-limits and an invisible virus makes up look at the outside world with suspicion. No surprise, then, that sustainability and the climate movement aren't exactly a priority for many these days.

Read More Show Less
Ingredients are displayed for the Old School Pinto Beans from the Decolonize Your Diet cookbook by Luz Calvo and Catriona Rueda Esquibel. Melissa Renwick / Toronto Star via Getty Images

By Molly Matthews Multedo

Livestock farming contributes to global warming, so eating less meat can be better for the climate.

Read More Show Less