Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Proposed Natural Gas Pipeline through Ohio Raises Grave Concern

Energy

Thanks to News Channel 5's investigator Sarah Buduson for interviewing me regarding the proposed 250-mile Nexus Gas transmission pipeline from Northeast Ohio to Canada. The pipeline would transport Utica shale gas from fields in eastern Ohio to customers in Ohio, Michigan and Ontario, Canada with possible plans of an expansion once operations begin in November 2015. The $1.2 to $1.5 billion pipeline announced this week would accelerate fracking throughout Ohio and threaten the long-term sustainability of the economy, human health and the environment.

The three companies that signed an agreement to develop the new transmission line include Spectra Energy Corp., Enbridge, Inc. of Canada and Detroit-based DTE Energy. We don't have to look far to learn about Enbridge's safety record. July 25 was the two-year anniversary of Michigan's Kalamazoo disaster, when an estimated 1.1 million gallons of raw tar sands crude oil burst from a pipeline into a creek that feeds the Kalamazoo River.

The ruptured Kalamazoo tar sands pipeline. Photo courtesy of National Transportation Safety Board.

The oil spread quickly in the flooded river, coating wildlife, saturating marshlands, backyards, businesses and farmland. The raw tar sands oil disaster was caused by a break in a pipeline owned by Enbridge, which knew of safety problems with the pipeline for years before the disaster.

Enbridge is involved in many controversial pipeline projects including the Northern Gateway pipeline that will build a dual pipeline from the tar sands to the B.C. coast carrying heavy bitumen 1,200 kilometres one way and Middle Eastern condensate the other way across close to 1,000 streams and rivers. There is a revolutionary movement fighting this tar sands pipeline as British Columbians are thinking twice before allowing this pipeline to run through their backyards.

Spectra Energy Corp. is also involved in many controversial projects including a planned natural gas pipeline that is charted to run across land belonging to Chevron’s subsidiary, Texaco. The 16-mile long pipeline is slated to bring fracked gas from New Jersey, across Texaco’s property in Bayonne, under the Hudson River and into the West Village in Manhattan.

More than one million gallons of raw tar sands crude oil leaked into Michigan’s Kalamazoo River in July 2010. Photo courtesy Michigan Department of Environmental Quality.

I have grave concern regarding this project. Northern Ohioans need to educate themselves on this issue and get involved. Not only will this pipeline significantly accelerate fracking in Ohio, increasing groundwater contamination and air pollution, but it will increase the number of fracking wastewater injection wells and the amount of toxic fraking wastewater that needs to be disposed of with no proper disposal method available. We'll certainly need more cities in Ohio like Cincinnati, which has lead the way by banning fracking injection wells in their community.

The Nexus Gas transmission pipeline will have to be approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission before next steps can be taken. Stay tuned to EcoWatch.org as we'll continue to cover this story.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

More than 1,000 people were told to evacuate their homes when a wildfire ignited in the foothills west of Denver Monday, Colorado Public Radio reported.

Read More Show Less

Accessibility to quality health care has dropped for millions of Americans who lost their health insurance due to unemployment. mixetto / E+ / Getty Images

Accessibility to quality health care has dropped for millions of Americans who lost their health insurance due to unemployment. New research has found that 5.4 million Americans were dropped from their insurance between February and May of this year. In that three-month stretch more Americans lost their coverage than have lost coverage in any entire year, according to The New York Times.

Read More Show Less
Heat waves are most dangerous for older people and those with health problems. Global Jet / Flickr / CC by 2.0

On hot days in New York City, residents swelter when they're outside and in their homes. The heat is not just uncomfortable. It can be fatal.

Read More Show Less
Nearly 250 U.S. oil and gas companies are expected to file for bankruptcy by the end of next year. Joshua Doubek / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

Fracking companies are going bankrupt at a rapid pace, often with taxpayer-funded bonuses for executives, leaving harm for communities, taxpayers, and workers, the New York Time reports.

Read More Show Less
Trump introduces EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler during an event to announce changes to the National Environmental Policy Act, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on Jan. 9, 2020 in Washington, DC. The changes would make it easier for federal agencies to approve infrastructure projects without considering climate change. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

A report scheduled for release later Tuesday by Congress' non-partisan Government Accountability Office (GAO) finds that the Trump administration undervalues the costs of the climate crisis in order to push deregulation and rollbacks of environmental protections, according to The New York Times.

Read More Show Less
The American Federation of Teachers (AFT), National Education Association (NEA), and AASA, The School Superintendents Association, voiced support for safe reopening measures. www.vperemen.com / Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY-SA

By Kristen Fischer

It's going to be back-to-school time soon, but will children go into the classrooms?

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) thinks so, but only as long as safety measures are in place.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Critics charge the legislation induces poor communities to sell off their water rights. Pexels

By Eoin Higgins

Over 300 groups on Monday urged Senate leadership to reject a bill currently under consideration that would incentivize communities to sell off their public water supplies to private companies for pennies on the dollar.

Read More Show Less