Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Prince William and Prince Charles Speak Out on Illicit Wildlife Trafficking

Prince William and Prince Charles Speak Out on Illicit Wildlife Trafficking

His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales Prince Charles and the Duke of Cambridge Prince William yesterday met with representatives from the United for Wildlife partnership, which comprises seven of the world’s most influential conservation organizations and the Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry.

Prince William and Prince Charles were briefed on the outcomes of a study carried out by TRAFFIC on behalf of United for Wildlife and commissioned by the Royal Foundation into the impact of illegal wildlife trade on elephant, rhino, big cats and pangolin populations.

Black Rhino poached in Zimbabwe Photo credit: © Anti-poaching Unit, Zimbabwe

The Princes also learned about effective solutions to address illegal wildlife trade from the Zoological Society of London, including the use of new technology such as drones, sensors, remote cameras employing human recognition technology and other tracking devices to assist enforcement officers.

Speaking during a tour of London Zoo, where Prince William and Prince Charles visited the tiger enclosure, Prince William spoke about his plans for the United for Wildlife partnership.

He said he wanted to “get them in one room to focus their energy and their commitment to one cause—particularly obviously this illegal wildlife trade at the moment is such a big issue.”

“The idea was that United for Wildlife can progress and we can really start the ball rolling and the momentum and really try and change and tackle this issue,” said Prince William. 

Prince Charles drew attention to the need to support NGOs working in this field, including TRAFFIC. He said, “One of the most important things is helping the NGOs who struggle away, particularly organisations like TRAFFIC and WildAid and the World Wildlife Fund, of which I'm president in the UK. They're doing a fantastic job but they're up against a huge series of obstacles."

“The most important thing to remember, I think, is that you have to reduce consumption of illegal wildlife parts, whether it’s ivory, or rhino horn, Tiger parts, or whatever from various endangered species," Prince Charles continued. 

Government-held rhino horn stockpile Photo credit: © Simon Milledge / TRAFFIC

The United for Wildlife partnership is a long-term commitment to tackle the global challenges to the world’s natural resources so they can be safeguarded for future generations. The Duke of Cambridge is President of the collaboration.

The seven organizations within the United for Wildlife partnership include TRAFFIC’s partners, World Wildlife Fund-UK and International Union for Conservation of Nature; together with Conservation InternationalFauna & Flora InternationalThe Nature ConservancyWildlife Conservation Society and the Zoological Society of London.

Earlier, Prince Charles hosted at Clarence House a high-level media briefing on a summit that will be hosted by the UK government next February that aims to bring together high-level representatives from governments from around the world to define and agree joint commitments for tackling illicit wildlife trafficking.

Visit EcoWatch’s BIODIVERSITY page for more related news on this topic.

Lakota spiritual leader Chief Arvol Looking Horse attends a demonstration against the proposed Keystone XL pipeline from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico in front of the White House in Washington, DC, on January 28, 2015. Nicholas Kamm / AFP / Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden is planning to cancel the controversial Keystone XL pipeline on the first day of his administration, a document reported by CBC on Sunday suggests.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A plume of smoke from wildfires burning in the Angeles National Forest is seen from downtown Los Angeles on Aug. 29, 2009 in Los Angeles, California. Kevork Djansezian / Getty Images

California is bracing for rare January wildfires this week amid damaging Santa Ana winds coupled with unusually hot and dry winter weather.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A new study invites parents of cancer patients to answer questions about their environment. FatCamera / Getty Images

By Jennifer Sass, Nsedu Obot Witherspoon, Dr. Philip J. Landrigan and Simon Strong

"Prevention is the cure for child/teen cancer." This is the welcoming statement on a website called 'TheReasonsWhy.Us', where families affected by childhood cancers can sign up for a landmark new study into the potential environmental causes.

Read More Show Less
Madagascar has been experiencing ongoing droughts and food insecurity since 2016. arturbo / Getty Images

Nearly 1.6 million people in the southern part of Madagascar have faced food insecurity since 2016, experiencing one drought after another, the United Nations World Food Program reported.

Read More Show Less
German Chancellor Angela Merkel and German ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst stand at the Orion spacecraft during a visit at the training unit of the Columbus space laboratory at the European Astronaut training centre of the European Space Agency ESA in Cologne, Germany on May 18, 2016. Ina Fassbender / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

By Monir Ghaedi

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to keep most of Europe on pause, the EU aims for a breakthrough in its space program. The continent is seeking more than just a self-sufficient space industry competitive with China and the U.S.; the industry must also fit into the European Green Deal.

Read More Show Less