Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

President Obama Issues Executive Order to Prepare U.S. For Impacts of Climate Change

Climate

By Rob Moore

On Friday President Obama issued an Executive Order on climate preparedness, directing federal agencies to begin identifying and removing barriers to actions that would, “increase the Nation’s resilience to climate change while ensuring continued protection of public health and the environment.” Agencies have been given nine months to identify those barriers and report back to an interagency climate preparedness council.

President Obama issued an Executive Order on climate preparedness and created a Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience made up of state, local and tribal leaders.

Long-term this could be a very valuable thing to do, as it should influence how billions in federal dollars are spent on water, energy and transportation infrastructure as well as disaster preparedness and recovery. Currently, little consideration is given to rising sea levels, susceptibility to flooding and extreme weather, and other climate impacts that could affect major infrastructure projects in the future. Making climate impacts a consideration today will help us avoid damage tomorrow, both by steering funds away from projects that don’t make good climate sense and towards infrastructure projects that do.

The President also formed a Task Force on Climate Preparedness and Resilience made up of state, local and tribal leaders. The Task Force will provide information on how the federal government can deploy grant and loan programs more effectively to assist state and local climate preparedness activities and also advise the President on what kinds of information and tools state, local and tribal governments need to make better decisions. The Task Force members are identified on the map below as well as listed.

State Officials:

Gov. Neil Abercrombie (D-HI)

Gov. Jerry Brown (D-CA)

Gov. Eddie Calvo (R-GU)

Gov. Jay Inslee (D-WA)

Gov. Jack Markell (D-DE)

Gov. Martin O’Malley (D-MD)

Gov. Pat Quinn (D-IL)

Gov. Peter Shumlin (D-VT)

Local Officials:

Mayor Ralph Becker (Salt Lake City, UT)

Mayor James Brainard (Carmel, IN)

Commissioner Paula Brooks (Franklin County, OH)

Supervisor Salud Carbajal (Santa Barbara County, CA)

Mayor Frank Cownie (Des Moines, IA)

Mayor Bob Dixson (Greensburg, KS)

Mayor Eric Garcetti (Los Angeles, CA)

Mayor George Heartwell (Grand Rapids, MI)

Mayor Kristin Jacobs (Broward County, FL)

Mayor Kevin Johnson (Sacramento, CA)

Mayor Michael Nutter (Philadelphia, PA)

Mayor Annise Parker (Houston, TX)

Mayor Patsy Parker (Perdido Beach, AL)

Mayor Madeline Rogero (Knoxville, TN)

Mayor Karen Weitkunat (Fort Collins, CO)

Mayor Dawn Zimmer (Hoboken, NJ)

Tribal Officials:

Karen Diver, Chairwoman, Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa (MN)

Reggie Joule, Mayor, Northwest Arctic Borough (AK)

Visit EcoWatch’s CLIMATE CHANGE page for more related news on this topic.

———

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Much of Eastern Oklahoma, including most of Tulsa, remains an Indian reservation, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday. JustTulsa / CC BY 2.0

Much of Eastern Oklahoma, including most of Tulsa, remains an Indian reservation, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday.

Read More Show Less
The Firefly Watch project is among the options for aspiring citizen scientists to join. Mike Lewinski / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 2.0

By Tiffany Means

Summer and fall are great seasons to enjoy the outdoors. But if you're already spending extra time outside because of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may be out of ideas on how to make fresh-air activities feel special. Here are a few suggestions to keep both adults and children entertained and educated in the months ahead, many of which can be done from the comfort of one's home or backyard.

Read More Show Less
People sit at the bar of a restaurant in Austin, Texas, on June 26, 2020. Texas Governor Greg Abbott ordered bars to be closed by noon on June 26 and for restaurants to be reduced to 50% occupancy. Coronavirus cases in Texas spiked after being one of the first states to begin reopening. SERGIO FLORES / AFP via Getty Images

The coronavirus may linger in the air in crowded indoor spaces, spreading from one person to the next, the World Health Organization acknowledged on Thursday, as The New York Times reported. The announcement came just days after 239 scientists wrote a letter urging the WHO to consider that the novel coronavirus is lingering in indoor spaces and infecting people, as EcoWatch reported.

Read More Show Less
A never-before-documented frog species has been discovered in the Peruvian highlands and named Phrynopus remotum. Germán Chávez

By Angela Nicoletti

The eastern slopes of the Andes Mountains in central Perú are among the most remote places in the world.

Read More Show Less
Left: Lemurs in Madagascar on March 30, 2017. Mathias Appel / Flickr. Right: A North Atlantic right whale mother and calf. National Marine Fisheries Service

A new analysis by scientists at the Swiss-based International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) found that lemurs and the North Atlantic right whale are on the brink of extinction.

Read More Show Less
Nobody knows exactly how much vitamin D a person actually needs. However, vitamin D is becoming increasingly popular. Colin Dunn / Flickr / CC by 2.0

By Julia Vergin

It is undisputed that vitamin D plays a role everywhere in the body and performs important functions. A severe vitamin D deficiency, which can occur at a level of 12 nanograms per milliliter of blood or less, leads to severe and painful bone deformations known as rickets in infants and young children and osteomalacia in adults. Unfortunately, this is where the scientific consensus ends.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Data from a scientist measuring macroalgal communities in rocky shores in the Argentinean Patagonia would be added to the new system. Patricia Miloslavich / University of Delaware

Ocean scientists have been busy creating a global network to understand and measure changes in ocean life. The system will aggregate data from the oceans, climate and human activity to better inform sustainable marine management practices.

EcoWatch sat down with some of the scientists spearheading the collaboration to learn more.

Read More Show Less