Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Pope Francis to Open Vatican Farm to the Public

Food
Pope Francis to Open Vatican Farm to the Public

It makes sense that the Pope who took his name from the patron saint of animals would be an animal lover. So, it comes as no surprise that Pope Francis has decided to open up the 50-acre Vatican farm at Castel Gandolfo to the public.

Cows roam freely in a pasture on the farm at Castel Gandolfo. Photo credit: Catholic News Service / L'Osservatore Romano

The property, which is located 15 miles outside of Rome (that's right, the Pope adheres to a 15-mile diet), has been a summer vacation home for the Popes since the 16th century. Placed among Roman ruins, beautiful villas and breathtaking views of the Tyrrhenian Sea, the farm was established by Pope Pius XI in the 1930s and has been providing meat, dairy and produce to the Popes ever since.

The decision to open up the farm was praised by the public, just like his move early last year to open up the gardens at Castel Gandolfo, which have been visited by more than 8,000 people. The farm, which employs eight people—one of whom has worked there for 33 years and served four popes—contains 800-year-old olive trees that produce more than 300 gallons of olive oil annually. Eighty cows and several donkeys supply the papal residence with milk, cheese, butter and yogurt. There is a sprawling vegetable garden, a greenhouse and ostriches, rabbits, chickens and turkeys. A van delivers food such as eggs, vegetables, yogurt, honey, cheese and olive oil to the Vatican every day. The excess produce is sold in Rome supermarkets, which allows the farm to be self-sustaining.

The Director of Operations,Vincenzo Scaccioni, chose to make beekeeping a priority when he came on in 2013. "Bees are a symbol of industriousness, unity and a community that gives fruit," Scaccioni said. "It is an example that the church, deep down, is a hive, though not one that stings, but gives honey." Scaccioni noted the farm's larger significance by saying that the farm is "precisely a sign of the pope's attention to creation, to nature, to the rural world."

The "People's Pope," as he is known, has stated that "access to food is a basic human right that shouldn't be subject to market speculation and quests for profit." He is an adamant supporter of food justice, proper nutrition for everyone, stewardship to the land and fighting climate change. Providing the public with access to the farm is a way to spread his message and show his support for a sustainable and equitable food system, and healthy planet.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Pope Francis to Escalate Demand for Climate Action in 2015

Pope Francis: 'Unbridled Consumerism' Is Destroying Our Planet

The Solution Under Our Feet: How Regenerative Organic Agriculture Can Save the Planet

Fall is with us and winter is around the corner, so the season for colds and flu has begun — joining COVID-19. monstArrr / Getty Images

By Gudrun Heise

Just as scientists are scoring successes in coronavirus research, new problems are on their way. Fall is with us and winter is around the corner, so the season for colds and flu has begun — joining COVID-19.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Icebergs float at the mouth of the Ilulissat Icefjord during a week of unseasonably warm weather on Aug. 4, 2019 near Ilulissat, Greenland. Sean Gallup /Getty Images

Rising temperatures in the air and the water surrounding Greenland are melting its massive ice sheet at a faster rate than anytime in the last 12 millennia, according to a new study published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A grim new assessment of the world's flora and fungi has found that two-fifths of its species are at risk of extinction as humans encroach on the natural world, as The Guardian reported. That puts the number of species at risk near 140,000.

Read More Show Less
Flowers like bladderwort have changed their UV pigment levels in response to the climate crisis. Jean and Fred / CC BY 2.0

As human activity transforms the atmosphere, flowers are changing their colors.

Read More Show Less
A factory in Newark, N.J. emits smoke in the shadow of NYC on January 18, 2018. Kena Betancur / VIEWpress / Corbis / Getty Images

By Sharon Zhang

Back in March, when the pandemic had just planted its roots in the U.S., President Donald Trump directed the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to do something devastating: The agency was to indefinitely and cruelly suspend environmental rule enforcement. The EPA complied, and for just under half a year, it provided over 3,000 waivers that granted facilities clemency from state-level environmental rule compliance.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch