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Pledge to Skip Your Shower and Be Part of Saving 1 Million Gallons of Water

Water is a precious, yet finite, resource that many of us take for granted. With severe drought and water shortages around the world, we can all look at our water footprint and find ways to conserve. A good place to start is our daily shower. In fact, a 10-minute shower could waste more than 40 gallons of water.

So in honor of World Water Day on March 22, Surfrider Foundation launched Every Drop Counts campaign, calling for people to skip this regular ritual.

The nonprofit says that if 25,000 people take the pledge to reduce the amount of water they use each day and skip their shower on World Water Day, nearly one million gallons of water will be saved. Their website will tally the total amount of water that will be conserved as a result of the campaign.

The Surfrider Foundation works to protect the world's ocean, waves, beaches and raises awareness about water conservation. "Our everyday water use at our homes ultimately impacts the ocean waters we swim, surf and play in," Surfrider CEO Dr. Chad Nelsen said. "Following a drop of water from its origin, through its use, and then its disposal into our oceans, reveals an expensive, wasteful and often dirty journey."

North American faucet brand Moen found that the average showers last about 13 minutes, but a good chunk of consumers (37 percent) want to conserve water. A recent report from Environment America found that more and more Americans "are concerned with the pollution and quality of our waterways more than any other environmental issue."

Besides shorter showers, Surfrider also suggests we can save water by turning off the tap while brushing your teeth (it saves 300 gallons of water per month), fixing leaky pipes on your property (which can waste up to five gallons of water per day), or redirecting rain gutters and downspouts to irrigate your yard.

In case you're wondering, it's okay and even healthy to skip the occasional shower since it helps your skin retain its natural oils. But if you can't forgo showering this March 22, you can consider replacing inefficient shower heads with low-flow models, such as EPA-approved WaterSense brands.

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