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Pledge to Eat Local and Organic on Thanksgiving

Food
Pledge to Eat Local and Organic on Thanksgiving

As we get ready to celebrate Thanksgiving with our family and friends, it's a perfect time to show our gratitude for Mother Earth and everything she provides us each day, including our food.

One great way to show our appreciation this holiday season is to eat local and organic.

Join Reverend Billy and the Stop Shopping Choir and pledge to make your family Thanksgiving meal as organic, local, non-GMO and pesticide free as possible.

Industrial agriculture and the entire globalized food system, which is becoming more large-scale and centralized every day, destroys biodiversity, soils and local food systems, and is responsible for accelerating climate change by contributing more than 40 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions. Buying local and organic food supports sustainable agriculture that nurtures the soil and promotes a rich diversity of crops, which is healthy for people and the planet while strengthening local economies.

In addition to encouraging people to eat local and organic this Thanksgiving, Reverend Billy and the Stop Shopping Choir will enjoy an organic Thanksgiving meal on the lawn of the world’s largest biotechnology seed company—Monsanto.

This celebration, at Monsanto's world headquarters in St. Louis, is sure to be festive as Reverend Billy and the Stop Shopping Choir will perform songs from their new show Monsanto Is the Devil.

This event is organized in collaboration with Organic Consumers Association, GMO Free Midwest, Gateway Garlic Urban Farms and The Greenhorns.

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