Quantcast
Popular
Crafted from pre- and postconsumer recycled cotton and upcycled plastic water bottles, the Hookline Short Sleeve Shirt from Toad & Co offers men a super-soft, no-iron, lightweight outfitting solution.

5 Items That Reincarnate Plastic Bottles Into Outdoor Gear

By Jill K. Robinson

What's the most environmentally friendly approach to gear and clothing?


Hang on to what you have and repair your goods. When it's replacement time, choose items upcycled from plastic to help keep bottles, fabric and other detritus out of landfills and waterways.

Here are four items that source responsibly reincarnated plastic.

NORTON POINT collects plastic from the canals and coastlines of Haiti, then processes it into pellets and molds them into frames for The Tide Sunglasses. The company recovers one pound of plastic for every pair of glasses sold. $89, nortonpoint.com

HAMILTON PERKINS's Earth Bag Lite is a simple duffel made from 17.5 plastic bottles and lined with vinyl fabric recycled from billboards. It comes in six colors and has an outer pocket. $95, hamiltonperkins.com

COLUMBIA's OutDry Extreme Eco Jacket is the apparel industry's first waterproof, breathable rainwear made with no added perfluorochemicals. Each is made from 100-percent-recycled polyester, crafted from 21 plastic bottles. $199, columbia.com

In a partnership with Parley for the Oceans, ADIDAS incorporates plastic waste from beaches into the yarn used to create Ultraboost Parley Shoes, a cushioned and supportive option for runners. Each pair contains an average of 11 plastic bottles. $200, adidas.com

Crafted from pre- and postconsumer recycled cotton and upcycled plastic water bottles, the Hookline Short Sleeve Shirt from TOAD&CO offers men a super-soft, no-iron, lightweight outfitting solution. This classic plaid button-up packs down easily and suits hikers (its shoulder seams were designed for backpack compatibility) and, as the name suggests, anglers waiting for the fish to bite. $65, toadandco.com

Reposted with permission from our media associate SIERRA Magazine.

Show Comments ()

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Sponsored
Popular

12 Great Summertime Reads

Summer is a time for escape reading. But that designation need not be limited to fiction; books written for the general reader on topics outside one's area of expertise can also provide passage to exciting new places. This month's bookshelf includes six non-fiction titles, five novels and one collection of short stories. The last three titles are now in paperback, suitable for a vacation or some beach time. Good reading to you!

Keep reading... Show less
Climate
Pexels

Cosmos Offers Clues to the Fate of Humans on Earth

By Marlene Cimons

Astrophysicist Adam Frank sees climate change through a cosmic lens. He believes our present civilization isn't the first to burn up its resources—and won't be the last. Moreover, he thinks it's possible the same burnout fate already might have befallen alien worlds. That's why he says the current conversation about climate change is all wrong. "We shouldn't be talking about saving the planet, because the Earth will go on without us," he said. "We should be talking about saving ourselves."

Keep reading... Show less
Popular
Chicago skyline on April 20, 2017. Chris Favero / CC BY-SA 2.0

Big Cities, Bright Lights: Ranking the Worst Light Pollution on Earth

By Dipika Kadaba

The amount of artificial lighting is steadily increasing every year around the planet. It's a cause for celebration in remote villages in Africa and the Indian sub-continent that recently gained access to electricity for the first time, but it is also harming the health and well-being of residents of megacities elsewhere that continue to get bigger and brighter every year.

Health impacts of this artificial illumination after daylight hours range from depression to cancer, including a range of sleep disorders.

Keep reading... Show less
Business
velkr0 / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

Texas Supreme Court Rules Cities Cannot Ban Plastic Bags

The Texas Supreme Court struck down the city of Laredo's plastic bag ban—a decision that will likely overturn similar bans in about a dozen other cities, including Austin, Fort Stockton and Port Aransas.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Politics
Ryan Zinke visits Wall Drug in Wall, South Dakota on May 25. Sherman Hogue / U.S. Dept. of the Interior

Report: Trump Admin. Suppressing Media Access of Government Scientists

A new Trump administration protocol requires U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists to run interview requests with the Department of the Interior, its parent agency, before speaking to journalists, the Los Angeles Times reported.

The move is a departure from past media practices that allowed government scientists to quickly respond to journalists' inquiries, according to unnamed USGS employees interviewed by the Times.

Keep reading... Show less
Climate
Icebergs calving from an ice shelf in West Antarctica. NASA / GSFC / Jefferson Beck / CC BY-SA 2.0

Good News From Antarctica: Rising Bedrock Could Save Vulnerable Ice Sheet

After last week's disturbing news that ice melt in Antarctica has tripled in the last five years, another study published Thursday offers some surprising good news for the South Pole and its vulnerable West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS).

The study, published in Science by an international research team, found that the bedrock below the WAIS is rising, a process known as "uplift," at record rates as melting ice removes weight, potentially stabilizing the ice sheet that scientists feared would be lost to climate change.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
GMO
Soybeans with cupped leaves, a symptom of dicamba injury. University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture / Flickr / CC BY-NC 2.0

Dicamba Damage Roars Back for Third Season in a Row

University weed scientists have reported roughly 383,000 acres of soybean injured by a weedkiller called dicamba so far in 2018, according to University of Missouri plant sciences professor, Kevin Bradley.

Dicamba destroys mostly everything in its path except the crops that are genetically engineered (GE) to resist it. The drift-prone chemical can be picked up by the wind and land on neighboring non-target fields. Plants exposed to the chemical are left wrinkled, cupped or stunted in growth.

Keep reading... Show less
Food
Memphis Meats

FDA Takes First Steps to Regulating Lab-Grown Meat

By Dan Nosowitz

Lab-grown meat—also known as cultured meat or in vitro meat—has long been enticing for its potential environmental, social and economic benefits.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored

mail-copy

The best of EcoWatch, right in your inbox. Sign up for our email newsletter!