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5 Items That Reincarnate Plastic Bottles Into Outdoor Gear

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Crafted from pre- and postconsumer recycled cotton and upcycled plastic water bottles, the Hookline Short Sleeve Shirt from Toad & Co offers men a super-soft, no-iron, lightweight outfitting solution.

By Jill K. Robinson

What's the most environmentally friendly approach to gear and clothing?


Hang on to what you have and repair your goods. When it's replacement time, choose items upcycled from plastic to help keep bottles, fabric and other detritus out of landfills and waterways.

Here are four items that source responsibly reincarnated plastic.

NORTON POINT collects plastic from the canals and coastlines of Haiti, then processes it into pellets and molds them into frames for The Tide Sunglasses. The company recovers one pound of plastic for every pair of glasses sold. $89, nortonpoint.com

HAMILTON PERKINS's Earth Bag Lite is a simple duffel made from 17.5 plastic bottles and lined with vinyl fabric recycled from billboards. It comes in six colors and has an outer pocket. $95, hamiltonperkins.com

COLUMBIA's OutDry Extreme Eco Jacket is the apparel industry's first waterproof, breathable rainwear made with no added perfluorochemicals. Each is made from 100-percent-recycled polyester, crafted from 21 plastic bottles. $199, columbia.com

In a partnership with Parley for the Oceans, ADIDAS incorporates plastic waste from beaches into the yarn used to create Ultraboost Parley Shoes, a cushioned and supportive option for runners. Each pair contains an average of 11 plastic bottles. $200, adidas.com

Crafted from pre- and postconsumer recycled cotton and upcycled plastic water bottles, the Hookline Short Sleeve Shirt from TOAD&CO offers men a super-soft, no-iron, lightweight outfitting solution. This classic plaid button-up packs down easily and suits hikers (its shoulder seams were designed for backpack compatibility) and, as the name suggests, anglers waiting for the fish to bite. $65, toadandco.com

Reposted with permission from our media associate SIERRA Magazine.

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