Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Plant it Forward: Apply Today for a $15,000 Gardens for Good Grant

Food

Everybody has a right to food, and we're of the opinion that it should be fresh and healthy. Unfortunately, more and more neighborhoods across North America are "food insecure," meaning people struggle to find affordable nutritious food. Especially in low-income urban communities, convenience stores and fast food chains are common, and the nearest grocery store is often many miles away.

Nature's Path is on a mission to change all that. Healthy, organic food is what we live for, and we think your community is ripe with possibility. That's what inspired us to create our Gardens for Good grant program through which we give away three $15,000 grants annually to nonprofits dedicated to feeding their communities. With our support, visionary organic garden projects are greening urban environments and bringing healthy, organic food to those who need it most. 

In the first phase of the Gardens for Good grant application, nonprofits with a solid plan and access to land share their vision with us in a 500-word essay. An empty lot or a few acres are equally powerful tools for change, and we want to hear how we can help you answer the unique needs of your community. Applications are open until June 22, 2014.

Once applications are in, where the gardens bloom is up to the people. In the grant's second phase, applicants reach out for support, and their community rallies behind them, voting for their favorite project until July 6. Winning projects are set up for success because Gardens for Good helps motivate communities from the get-go, and the grassroots nonprofits who apply win special places in the hearts of their supporters. For 2012 winner Table Community Food Center, "the Gardens for Good contest was one of our earliest experiences of the community rallying to support us. Being in the contest was a team building experience for our staff, and it was exciting and motivating for the whole center." They've been growing food and spreading their knowledge through the community to great success ever since. 

From the nine organizations that receive the most public votes (six in the U.S. and three in Canada), we choose three winners based on the strength of the applications to receive a $15,000 cash grant from Nature's Path. Our partners at Organic Gardening magazine round out the prize with technical design and production mentorship to help projects get growing. 

Anyone can plant a seed, but a community can help it grow. If you're a nonprofit with a vision for organic agriculture and a passion for feeding your community, we at Nature's Path want to hear from you. Tell us how you'll change the world—we'd love to help. Apply before June 22, 2014!

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Zak Smith

It is pretty amazing that in this moment when the COVID-19 outbreak has much of the country holed up in their homes binging Netflix, the most watched show in America over the last few weeks has been focused on wildlife trade — which scientists believe is the source of the COVID-19 pandemic. Make no mistake: Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem and Madness is about wildlife trade and other aspects of wildlife exploitation, just as surely as the appearance of Ebola, SARS, MERS, avian flu and probably COVID-19 in humans is a result of wildlife exploitation. As a conservationist, this is one of the things I've been thinking about while watching Tiger King. Here are five more:

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Hector Chapa

With the coronavirus pandemic quickly spreading, U.S. health officials have changed their advice on face masks and now recommend people wear cloth masks in public areas where social distancing can be difficult, such as grocery stores.

But can these masks be effective?

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Jörg Carstensen / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Carey Gillam

Bayer AG is reneging on negotiated settlements with several U.S. law firms representing thousands of plaintiffs who claim exposure to Monsanto's Roundup herbicides caused them to develop non-Hodgkin lymphoma, sources involved in the litigation said on Friday.

Read More Show Less
Tom Werner / DigitalVision / Getty Images

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

With many schools now closed due to the current COVID-19 outbreak, you may be looking for activities to keep your children active, engaged, and entertained.

Although numerous activities can keep kids busy, cooking is one of the best choices, as it's both fun and educational.

Read More Show Less
In Germany's Hunsrück village of Schorbach, numerous photovoltaic systems are installed on house roofs, on Sept. 19, 2019. Thomas Frey / Picture Alliance via Getty Images

Germany's target for renewable energy sources to deliver 65% of its consumed electricity by 2030 seemed on track Wednesday, with 52% of electricity coming from renewables in 2020's first quarter. Renewable energy advocates, however, warned the trend is imperiled by slowdowns in building new wind and solar plants.

Read More Show Less