Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Pipeline Posse Tells Ed Schultz: 'It's Not About the Money, It's About the Future Generations'

Energy
Pipeline Posse Tells Ed Schultz: 'It's Not About the Money, It's About the Future Generations'

As the Senate continues to debate the Keystone XL, MSNBC's Ed Schultz traveled to Nebraska to meet with landowners that are taking a strong stand against the tar sands pipeline.

"These Americans are standing up to special interests and refusing to let their future be decided by Republicans who just don't understand the issues," said Schultz on last nights The Ed Show.

Ed Schultz meets with the Pipeline Posse in Nebraska last weekend to learn more about the landowners that are taking a strong stand against the Keystone XL pipeline.

The Nebraskans Schultz met with call themselves the "Pipeline Posse," more than 100 landowners that claim they have the legal muscle to stop the pipeline. Schultz also spoke with Brian Jorde, the lead attorney on the eminent domain cases, who claims that this pipeline won't be built anytime soon.

Nebraska landowner Jim Carlson shared that he's been offered by TransCanada $307,000 to allow the pipeline on his land. When Schultz asked him if he can be bought, he said, "No, because my land is worth more to me and my family than any amount of money they could offer me, or would offer me."

Bold Nebraska executive director Jane Kleeb shared with Schultz her disgust with misinformation being spread by lawmakers, both Democrat and Republican. Sen. "Joe Manchin [D-W.Va.] needs to actually get on the page of fact verses a talking point memo he's been given by TransCanada or API," Kleeb told Schultz.

"It's not about the money, it's about the future generations," the Pipeline Posse told Schultz.

Watch here as Schultz talks with the folks who are willing to put it all on the line to stop the Keystone XL pipeline:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Tell President Obama: Veto Keystone XL Pipeline Bill

Robert Redford: Why Keystone XL Is the Wrong Choice for America

Senate Votes 98-1 That Climate Change Is Not a Hoax, But…

A deadly tornado touched down near the city of Fultondale, Alabama on Jan. 25, 2021. Justin1569 / Wikipedia Commons / CC BY-SA 3.0

A tornado tore through a city north of Birmingham, Alabama, Monday night, killing one person and injuring at least 30.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

An empty school bus by a field of chemical plants in "Cancer Alley," one of the most polluted areas of the U.S. that stretches from New Orleans to Baton Rouge, where oil refineries and petrochemical plants reside alongside suburban homes. Giles Clarke / Getty Images

By David Konisky

On his first day in office President Joe Biden started signing executive orders to reverse Trump administration policies. One sweeping directive calls for stronger action to protect public health and the environment and hold polluters accountable, including those who "disproportionately harm communities of color and low-income communities."

Read More Show Less

Trending

Pixabay

By Katherine Kornei

Clear-cutting a forest is relatively easy—just pick a tree and start chopping. But there are benefits to more sophisticated forest management. One technique—which involves repeatedly harvesting smaller trees every 30 or so years but leaving an upper story of larger trees for longer periods (60, 90, or 120 years)—ensures a steady supply of both firewood and construction timber.

Read More Show Less
Icebergs near Ilulissat, Greenland on Oct. 13, 2020. Climate change is having a profound effect with glaciers and the Greenland ice cap retreating. Ulrik Pedersen / NurPhoto via Getty Images

Earth's ice is melting 57 percent faster than in the 1990s and the world has lost more than 28 trillion tons of ice since 1994, research published Monday in The Cryosphere shows.

Read More Show Less
Caribbean islands such as Trinidad have plenty of water for swimming, but locals face water shortages for basic needs. Marc Guitard / Getty Images

By Jewel Fraser

Noreen Nunez lives in a middle-class neighborhood that rises up a hillside in Trinidad's Tunapuna-Piarco region.

Read More Show Less