Quantcast

Drink This Pineapple-Wheatgrass Shot for an Anti-Inflammatory Boost

Health + Wellness
Healthline

Made from the freshly sprouted leaves of Triticum aestivum, wheatgrass is known for its nutrient-dense and powerful antioxidant properties.


Many of these purported benefits come from the fact that it's made up of 70 percentchlorophyll. The idea is that consuming wheatgrass may come with chlorophyll's benefits, including detoxification, immune support, and anti-inflammationTrusted Source.

And yeah, we know — the thought of shooting down wheatgrass is usually not a pleasant one. That's why we love this fruity spin. Below we'll show you how to use fresh fruits to naturally sweeten your wheatgrass shot. But first: the benefits.

Wheatgrass Benefits

  • contains 70 percent chlorophyll, which is known to fight inflammation
  • rich in powerful antioxidants
  • excellent source of vitamins A, C, and E
  • exhibits detoxification and immune-boosting properties

An excellent source of vitamins A, C, and E, wheatgrass contains an ample dose of your daily required vitamins and minerals. Wheatgrass is rich in free radical-fighting antioxidantsTrusted Source like glutathione and vitamin C, and contains 17 amino acidsTrusted Source, including 8 essential acids.

Thanks to its anti-inflammatory properties, wheatgrass has also been proven to reduce cholesterolTrusted Source in animal studies.

Additionally, studies have found potential for wheatgrass to help with ulcers, anti-cancer therapy, constipation, skin diseases, tooth decay, liver detoxification, and digestive disorders.

Recipe for Fruity Wheatgrass Shot

Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 4 oz fresh wheatgrass
  • 2 cups peeled, chopped fresh pineapple
  • ½ orange, peeled

Directions

  1. Process all ingredients through a juicer.
  2. Divide the wheatgrass juice into 4 shots.

Pro tip: If you don't own a juicer, you can use a blender instead. Simply combine the fresh wheatgrass and fruit with 1/2 cup of water. Blend on the highest setting for around 60 seconds and then pour the contents through a strainer or cheesecloth.

Dosage: Consume 3.5 to 4 ounces of wheatgrass for a minimum of two weeks to feel the effects.

p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 21.0px; font: 18.0px 'Helvetica Neue'; color: #e93b2d; -webkit-text-stroke: #e93b2d; background-color: #ffffff} span.s1 {font-kerning: none} Possible Side Effects of Wheatgrass 

Wheatgrass is considered safe for most people to consume. However, some people have reported experiencing nausea, headaches, and diarrhea after taking it in supplement form. Although wheatgrass doesn't contain gluten — gluten is found only in the seeds of the wheat kernel, not the grass — if you have celiac disease, it's best to ask your doctor before using.

As always, check with your healthcare provider before adding anything to your everyday routine to determine what's best for you and your individual health.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Healthline.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

In this view from an airplane rivers of meltwater carve into the Greenland ice sheet near Sermeq Avangnardleq glacier on Aug. 4 near Ilulissat, Greenland. Climate change is having a profound effect in Greenland, where over the last several decades summers have become longer and the rate that glaciers and the Greenland ice cap are retreating has accelerated. Sean Gallup / Getty Images

The rate that Greenland's ice sheet is melting surpassed scientists' expectations and has raised concerns that their worst-case scenario predictions are coming true, Business Insider reported.

Read More Show Less
An Alagoas curassow in captivity. Luís Fábio Silveira / Agência Alagoas / Mongabay

By Pedro Biondi

Extinct in its habitat for at least three decades, the Alagoas curassow (Pauxi mitu) is now back in the jungle and facing a test of survival, thanks to the joint efforts of more than a dozen institutions to pull this pheasant-like bird back from the brink.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Elizabeth Warren's Blue New Deal aims to expand offshore renewable energy projects, like the Block Island Wind Farm in Rhode Island. Luke H. Gordon / Flickr

By Julia Conley

Sen. Elizabeth Warren expanded her vision for combating the climate crisis on Tuesday with the release of her Blue New Deal — a new component of the Green New Deal focusing on protecting and restoring the world's oceans after decades of pollution and industry-caused warming.

Read More Show Less
Former U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson leaves the courthouse after testifying in the Exxon Mobil trial on Oct. 30, 2019 in New York. DON EMMERT / AFP via Getty Images

A judge in New York's Supreme Court sided with Exxon in a case that accused the fossil fuel giant of lying to investors about the true cost of the climate crisis. The judge did not absolve Exxon from its contribution to the climate crisis, but insisted that New York State failed to prove that the company intentionally defrauded investors, as NPR reported.

Read More Show Less

By Sharon Elber

You may have heard that giving a pet for Christmas is just a bad idea. Although many people believe this myth, according to the ASPCA, 86 percent of adopted pets given as gifts stay in their new homes. These success rates are actually slightly higher than average adoption/rehoming rates. So, if done well, giving an adopted pet as a Christmas gift can work out.

Read More Show Less