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Drink This Pineapple-Wheatgrass Shot for an Anti-Inflammatory Boost

Health + Wellness
Healthline

Made from the freshly sprouted leaves of Triticum aestivum, wheatgrass is known for its nutrient-dense and powerful antioxidant properties.


Many of these purported benefits come from the fact that it's made up of 70 percentchlorophyll. The idea is that consuming wheatgrass may come with chlorophyll's benefits, including detoxification, immune support, and anti-inflammationTrusted Source.

And yeah, we know — the thought of shooting down wheatgrass is usually not a pleasant one. That's why we love this fruity spin. Below we'll show you how to use fresh fruits to naturally sweeten your wheatgrass shot. But first: the benefits.

Wheatgrass Benefits

  • contains 70 percent chlorophyll, which is known to fight inflammation
  • rich in powerful antioxidants
  • excellent source of vitamins A, C, and E
  • exhibits detoxification and immune-boosting properties

An excellent source of vitamins A, C, and E, wheatgrass contains an ample dose of your daily required vitamins and minerals. Wheatgrass is rich in free radical-fighting antioxidantsTrusted Source like glutathione and vitamin C, and contains 17 amino acidsTrusted Source, including 8 essential acids.

Thanks to its anti-inflammatory properties, wheatgrass has also been proven to reduce cholesterolTrusted Source in animal studies.

Additionally, studies have found potential for wheatgrass to help with ulcers, anti-cancer therapy, constipation, skin diseases, tooth decay, liver detoxification, and digestive disorders.

Recipe for Fruity Wheatgrass Shot

Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 4 oz fresh wheatgrass
  • 2 cups peeled, chopped fresh pineapple
  • ½ orange, peeled

Directions

  1. Process all ingredients through a juicer.
  2. Divide the wheatgrass juice into 4 shots.

Pro tip: If you don't own a juicer, you can use a blender instead. Simply combine the fresh wheatgrass and fruit with 1/2 cup of water. Blend on the highest setting for around 60 seconds and then pour the contents through a strainer or cheesecloth.

Dosage: Consume 3.5 to 4 ounces of wheatgrass for a minimum of two weeks to feel the effects.

p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 21.0px; font: 18.0px 'Helvetica Neue'; color: #e93b2d; -webkit-text-stroke: #e93b2d; background-color: #ffffff} span.s1 {font-kerning: none} Possible Side Effects of Wheatgrass 

Wheatgrass is considered safe for most people to consume. However, some people have reported experiencing nausea, headaches, and diarrhea after taking it in supplement form. Although wheatgrass doesn't contain gluten — gluten is found only in the seeds of the wheat kernel, not the grass — if you have celiac disease, it's best to ask your doctor before using.

As always, check with your healthcare provider before adding anything to your everyday routine to determine what's best for you and your individual health.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Healthline.

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