Quantcast

Pillsbury Flour Recalled Due to Salmonella Risk

Food
This is the type of flour being recalled by Pillsbury owner Hometown Food Company. USDA FSIS

More than 12,000 cases of Pillsbury brand flour have been recalled due to a potential Salmonella contamination, Food Safety News reported Sunday.

The recall was first announced Friday night on the websites of Publix and Winn-Dixie, two grocery stores that carried the product. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) then tweeted out a recall notice Monday.


The recall was issued voluntarily by Pillsbury owner Hometown Food Company and affects around 12,185 cases of Pillsbury Unbleached All Purpose Flour with lot codes of 8 292 and a best-by date of April 19, 2020 or 8 293 and a best-by date of April 20, 2020, CNN reported.

"Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase for a refund," Publix wrote in a recall notice reported by Food Safety News.

Neither grocery store's recall notice mentioned how or when the flour became contaminated. The Winn-Dixie announcement said that there had been no reports of illness associated with the product so far.

Hometown Food Company bought Pillsbury's baking and desserts product in September, 2018, USA Today reported.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) used the recall as a teachable moment on the dangers of eating uncooked flour.

It retweeted the recall with a link to an article on the dangers of raw dough. Most customers think that eating dough is dangerous because of the presence of uncooked eggs, but the FDA explained that flour itself can be contaminated.

"Flour is derived from a grain that comes directly from the field and typically is not treated to kill bacteria," senior advisor in FDA's Office of Food Safety Leslie Smoot, Ph.D. said. If animals relieve themselves in a field, for example, nothing has been done to the flour between harvesting and purchase to kill those bacteria.

In 2016, dozens of people learned this the hard way when they came down with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli O121. The FDA, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state and local authorities investigated the outbreak and identified the bacterium making people sick in flour that had been used in dough eaten raw by some of the patients. In the end, ten million pounds of flour were recalled, the FDA said.

If you love cookie-dough ice cream, don't worry; the FDA says that commercial brands should be made with treated flour and pasteurized eggs.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Activists in North Dakota confront pipeline construction activities. A Texas bill would impose steep penalties for such protests. Speak Freely / ACLU

By Eoin Higgins

A bill making its way through the Texas legislature would make protesting pipelines a third-degree felony, the same as attempted murder.

Read More Show Less
An Australian flag flutters in the wind in a dry drought-ridden landscape. Virginia Star / Moment / Getty Images

Australia re-elected its conservative governing Liberal-National coalition Saturday, despite the fact that it has refused to cut down significantly on greenhouse gas emissions or coal during its time in power, The New York Times reported.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Tree lined street, UK. Richard Newstead / Moment / Getty Images

The UK government will fund the planting of more than 130,000 trees in English towns and cities in the next two years as part of its efforts to fight climate change, The Guardian reported Sunday.

Read More Show Less
A tropical storm above Bangkok on Aug. 04, 2016. Hristo Rusev/ NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Jeff Turrentine

First off: Bangkok Wakes to Rain, the intricately wrought, elegantly crafted debut novel by the Thai-American author Pitchaya Sudbanthad, isn't really about climate change. This tale set in the sprawling subtropical Thai capital is ultimately a kind of family saga — although its interconnected characters aren't necessarily linked by a bloodline. What binds them is their relationship to a small parcel of urban land on which has variously stood a Christian mission, an upper-class family house, and a towering condominium. All of the characters have either called this place home or had some other significant connection to it.

Read More Show Less
orn_france / iStock / Getty Images

By Susan McCabe, BSc, RD

Dioscorea alata is a species of yam commonly referred to as purple yam, ube, violet yam, or water yam.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Left: MirageC / Moment / Getty Images Right: Pongsak Tawansaeng / EyeEm / Getty Images

By Lizzie Streit, MS, RDN, LD

Sole water is water saturated with pink Himalayan salt.

Read More Show Less
People march to TCF Bank Stadium to protest against the mascot for the Washington Redskins before the game against the Minnesota Vikings on Nov. 2, 2014 at TCF Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Hannah Foslien / Getty Images

Maine Gov. Janet Mills signed a bill into law Thursday banning public schools or universities in the state from using Native American mascots, names or imagery. Mills' action will make Maine the first state in the nation with such a ban once it goes into effect later this year, The Bangor Daily News reported.

Read More Show Less
A man protests against the use of disposable plastics outside the Houses of Parliament on March 28 in London. John Keeble / Getty Images

Plastic pollution across the globe is suffocating our planet and driving Earth toward catastrophic climatic conditions if not curbed significantly and immediately, according to a new report by the Center for International Environmental Law (CEIL).

Read More Show Less