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Phil Radford

As the executive director of Greenpeace, Phil Radford is at the helm of one of the largest and most influential environmental groups in the country. Radford leads a national team of 500 highly-skilled environmental leaders working on national and international campaigns to protect our planet’s oceans, forests and climate.

Radford began his environmental career organizing to shut down incinerators near his family home in Oak Park, Illinois, just outside of Chicago. Soon after, he found himself fundraising locally for environmental issues. With his roots in local organizing and fundraising, Radford has always specialized in mobilizing people to raise their voices for the planet.

Prior to taking on his current role, Radford worked as Greenpeace’s Grassroots Director for 6 years. As director he built what has now become a thriving and strategic grassroots program, including online and on-the-ground organizing, student organizing and training, and a 15-city national street fundraising program.

Before joining Greenpeace, Radford founded Power Shift, a non-profit organization dedicated to creating clean energy market breakthroughs. As executive director, he worked with the cities of San Diego, Chula Vista, Berkeley, and others to secure solar energy efficiency investments for municipal buildings. He also won a commitment from Citigroup to offer and market energy efficient mortgages to make solar and wind power affordable for American home owners.

Radford has a degree from Washington University in St. Louis and a certificate in Non-profit Management from Georgetown University.

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