Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Pete Nichols

Pete Nichols

Pete Nichols joined the staff of Waterkeeper Alliance in July of 2011 as the western regional director after serving on the Waterkeeper Alliance Board of Directors for three years as Pacific Regional Representative and nearly eight years as the Humboldt Baykeeper.

Nichols was co-founder of Humboldt Baykeeper, and was the Baykeeper and executive director since its inception. Nichols has a background in Conservation Biology and has been involved in conservation in northern California for more than fifteen years. 

Originally inspired from the lakes and coastal waters of his childhood home of Maine, Nichols has always been an advocate for the environment. Upon arriving in northern California in 1992, he was deeply involved in the struggle to protect the last remnants of the region’s ancient redwood forests. Prior to his arrival at Humboldt Baykeeper, Nichols acted as the project and science coordinator for the California Wildlands Project, a habitat-based conservation planning project of the California Wilderness Coalition. 

A successful effort to defeat a proposed Liquefied Natural Gas proposal on Humboldt Bay in 2003, led Pete and others to realize that there was a need for a and strong advocate for Humboldt Bay and coastal waters of the north coast of California. In October of 2004, Humboldt Baykeeper was formed, and has been a strong voice for the Bay and coast ever since.

In addition to his role at the Waterkeeper Alliance, Nichols is also the founder and president of the Nature Iraq Foundation, a philanthropic charity dedicated to protecting the environment of the Middle East. Pete also serves on the board of the Friends of the Eel River and is the president of the Northcoast Environmental Center, a bioregional conservation organization for northwest California and southern Oregon.

A 3-hour special film by EarthxTV calls for protection of the Amazon and its indigenous populations. EarthxTV.org

To save the planet, we must save the Amazon rainforest. To save the rainforest, we must save its indigenous peoples. And to do that, we must demarcate their land.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres delivers a video speech at the high-level meeting of the 46th session of the United Nations Human Rights Council UNHRC in Geneva, Switzerland on Feb. 22, 2021. Xinhua / Zhang Cheng via Getty Images

By Anke Rasper

"Today's interim report from the UNFCCC is a red alert for our planet," said UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres.

The report, released Friday, looks at the national climate efforts of 75 states that have already submitted their updated "nationally determined contributions," or NDCs. The countries included in the report are responsible for about 30% of the world's global greenhouse gas emissions.

Read More Show Less

Trending

New Delhi's smog is particularly thick, increasing the risk of vehicle accidents. SAJJAD HUSSAIN / AFP via Getty Images

India's New Delhi has been called the "world air pollution capital" for its high concentrations of particulate matter that make it harder for its residents to breathe and see. But one thing has puzzled scientists, according to The Guardian. Why does New Delhi see more blinding smogs than other polluted Asian cities, such as Beijing?

Read More Show Less
A bridge over the Delaware river connects New Hope, Pennsylvania with Lambertville, New Jersey. Richard T. Nowitz / Getty Images

In a historic move, the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) voted Thursday to ban hydraulic fracking in the region. The ban was supported by all four basin states — New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania and New York — putting a permanent end to hydraulic fracking for natural gas along the 13,539-square-mile basin, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.

Read More Show Less
Woodpecker

Colombia is one of the world's largest producers of coffee, and yet also one of the most economically disadvantaged. According to research by the national statistic center DANE, 35% of the population in Columbia lives in monetary poverty, compared to an estimated 11% in the U.S., according to census data. This has led to a housing insecurity issue throughout the country, one which construction company Woodpecker is working hard to solve.

Read More Show Less