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Pennsylvania Shalefield Justice Action Camp Nov. 10 - 12

Energy
Pennsylvania Shalefield Justice Action Camp Nov. 10 - 12

Shadbush Collective

Shabush Collective members and supporters picket the fracking site adjacent to the Henry Family Farm in Bessemer, Pennsylvania.

Join us for a weekend of trainings and workshops as we build the movement against fossil fuel extraction in Pennsylvania.

Over the past several months we’ve seen an incredible mobilization across the country aimed at stopping fracking, mountaintop removal, tar sands and other forms of harmful resource extraction. People everywhere are standing up to the fossil fuel industry to protect their communities and slow the climate crisis.

In the spirit of this national uprising, we hope to build and strengthen grassroots organizing in western Pennsylvania. The Shalefield Justice Action Camp will include trainings on traditional non-violent direct action tactics, as well as workshops and discussions on the impacts of fracking and coal production in our region, monitoring and media work, community organizing and movement building. This is also an opportunity to have fun and build community and solidarity among organizers throughout our region and beyond.

We are grateful to be hosted by the Henry family at their farm in Bessemer, PA. The Henry's have been fighting a fracking well operated by Shell Oil on a neighboring property.

The Shalefield Justice Action Camp will start mid-day on Saturday, Nov. 10 and conclude late afternoon on Monday, Nov. 12. Food and indoor housing (or camping if you prefer) will be provided. Registration, program, and logistical information are available at shadbushcollective.org.

Visit EcoWatch’s ENERGY page for more related news on this topic.

 

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