Quantcast

Paul Smith’s College and Cornell University Launch New Initiative to Connect People and Planet

Nestled in the forests of the Adirondacks, Paul Smith’s College is known for setting the bar in environmentally-focused education. On Monday Paul Smith’s announced the launch of its newest project to enhance sustainability as a campus-wide initiative, a joint effort with the Cornell Cooperative Extension.

The new program will connect people with nature and local landscapes to promote positive environmentalism. Photo credit: Cornell University

“This collaborative project will enable our students at Paul Smith’s College to connect what they learn in the classroom with real world applications,” explained Brett McLeod, associate professor and program director.

The Adirondack Center for Working Landscapes (ACWL) is a multi-phase project that will link policy, education and practice through healthy land, healthy food and healthy communities. The program will connect people with the landscapes to promote positive environmentalism that establishes harmony between humans and the Earth. As a joint effort with Cornell Cooperative Extension, of Cornell University, the ACWL will invest in educational outreach and reframe environmental issues with a practical approach.

“Cornell has a reputation for its strengths in agriculture, and Paul Smith’s College has been the leader in forestry, tourism and natural resource management for nearly 70 years,” explained John W. Mills, PhD., President of Paul Smith’s College. “The ACWL partnership will enable the play-off of these strengths.”

The ACWL is the integration of education and economic reality—beyond sustainable agriculture and forestry—to related sectors such as agro-tourism, nutrition, lost arts, traditional skills, food systems and environmental education.

“Because humans are the chiefs of the ecological system, we have the environmental responsibility to integrate people with landscapes in a harmonious union,” said Mills. “This is essential for preserving our landscapes while fostering eco-tourism, agriculture and community development.”

The announcement was made by U.S. Representative Bill Owens of New York, followed by a discussion on the 2014 Farm Bill. Farmers and associated business owners were provided the opportunity to learn how to attain grants for their North Country businesses from the recently passed Farm Bill and other private and New York State sources.

“We at Cornell Cooperative Extension Franklin County are extremely pleased to be a founding partner of the ACWL,” said Rick LeVitre, executive director of the Cornell Cooperative Extension. “Our educational mission as the outreach arm of the land grant institution of Cornell and tied to U.S. Department of Agriculture makes our programs in agriculture and natural resources, nutrition and youth development an excellent fit with those of Paul Smith’s College and the VIC [Visitor Interpretive Center].” 

--------

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

Wash U Sit-In Enters Historic 3rd Week: Peabody Moment of Truth Arrives

28 College Teams Compete in Sustainable Home Design Challenge

Students Rally for Fossil Fuel Divestment at Ohio State Univeristy

--------

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Volunteers participate in 2018's International Coastal Cleanup in (clockwise from top left) the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Norway and Washington, DC. Ocean Conservancy / Gabriel Ortiz, David Kwaku Sakyi, Kristin Folsland Olsen, Emily Brauner

This coming Saturday, Sept. 21 is the International Coastal Cleanup (ICC), the annual Ocean Conservancy event that mobilizes volunteers in more than 100 countries to collect litter from beaches and waterways and record what they find.

Read More Show Less
Students hold a Youth Strike for Climate Change Protest in London, UK on May 24. Dinendra Haria / SOPA Images / LightRocket via Getty Images

The New York City public schools will allow their 1.1 million students to skip school for Friday's global climate strike, The New York Times reported Monday.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
The 16-year-old Swede Greta Thunberg speaks during her protest action for more climate protection with a reporter. Steffen Trumpf / picture alliance / Getty Images

By Mark Hertsgaard and Kyle Pope

It's been 30 years since Bill McKibben rang the warning bells about the threat of man-made climate change — first in a piece in The New Yorker, and then in his book, The End of Nature.

Read More Show Less
At the International Motor Show (IAA), climate protestors are calling for a change in transportation politics. © Kevin McElvaney / Greenpeace

Thousands of protestors marched in front of Frankfurt's International Motor Show (IAA) on Saturday to show their disgust with the auto industry's role in the climate crisis. The protestors demanded an end to combustion engines and a shift to more environmentally friendly emissions-free vehicles, as Reuters reported.

Read More Show Less
Setting and testing the line protections for Siemens SF6 gas insulated switchgear in 2007. Xaf / Flickr / CC BY-NC 2.0

Electricity from renewable sources is growing exponentially as the technology allows for cheaper and more efficient energy generation, but there is a dark side that has the industry polluting the most powerful greenhouse gas known to humanity, as the BBC reported.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Ella Olsson / Pexels

By Elizabeth Streit, MS, RDN, LD

Sweet and regular potatoes are both tuberous root vegetables, but they differ in appearance and taste.

They come from separate plant families, offer different nutrients, and affect your blood sugar differently.

Read More Show Less
Scientists in Saskatchewan found that consuming small amounts of neonicotinoids led white-crowned sparrows to lose significant amounts of weight and delay migration, threatening their ability to reproduce. Jen Goellnitz / Flickr

By Julia Conley

In addition to devastating effects on bee populations and the pollination needed to feed humans and other species, widely-used pesticides chemically related to nicotine may be deadly to birds and linked to some species' declines, according to a new study.

Read More Show Less

German Chancellor Angela Merkel's government is set to unveil a package of measures on Friday, Sept. 20, to ensure that the country cuts its greenhouse gas emissions 55% by 2030, compared with the 1990 levels.

Read More Show Less