Quantcast

Paris Climate Talks Will Not Be Canceled, Obama Will Attend

Climate

[Editor's note: For the latest update on the events related to COP21 in light of the Paris terrorist attacks, click here.]

The day after a deadly attack in Paris killed more than 120 people, a senior French diplomatic source told Reuters that the "French government plans to go ahead with a climate change summit" the country is hosting at the end of the month.

The source told Reuters, when asked whether the high-profile meeting could be put off, the venue changed or canceled, "that is in no way under consideration," but added that security could be boosted.

French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said the climate conference would go ahead as planned. "COP21 must be held," he said.

From Nov. 30 to Dec. 11, world leaders from more than 190 nations will gather in Paris to discuss a possible new global agreement on climate change that would reduce greenhouse gas emissions to avoid the catastrophic consequences of global warming.

President Obama announced last week he will attend the climate talks on Nov. 30 and Oct. 1. A U.S. official told AFP Saturday that "President Barack Obama still plans to participate in a UN climate conference near Paris in two weeks, despite attacks that killed 128 people in the French capital."

In anticipation of the climate talks, The Climate Reality Project was hosting its 24 Hours of Reality in Paris, adjacent to the Eiffel Tower, during the deadly attacks.

The event, hosted by Al Gore, was suspended Friday as the terrorist attacks began. The web-based live stream for the event was replaced with this statement:

“Out of solidarity with the French people and the city of Paris, we have decided to suspend our broadcast,” it says. “Our thoughts are with all who have been affected and the entire nation.”

Gore’s event, which started Friday at Noon ET, planned to feature artists including Elton John, Duran Duran, Florence + The Machine, Mumford & Sons and Neil Young.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

What is COP21? Find Out in This 2 Minute Video

Vandana Shiva: Agri-Corporations Attempt to Hijack COP21

How COP21 Will Unleash Massive Global Renewable Energy Growth

World Bank Climate Envoy Delivers Powerful Message on Coming Low-Carbon Revolution

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A verdant and productive urban garden in Havana. Susanne Bollinger / Wikimedia Commons

By Paul Brown

When countries run short of food, they need to find solutions fast, and one answer can be urban farming.

Read More Show Less
Trevor Noah appears on set during a taping of "The Daily Show with Trevor Noah" in New York on Nov. 26, 2018. The Daily Show With Trevor Noah / YouTube screenshot

By Lakshmi Magon

This year, three studies showed that humor is useful for engaging the public about climate change. The studies, published in The Journal of Science Communication, Comedy Studies and Science Communication, added to the growing wave of scientists, entertainers and politicians who agree.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
rhodesj / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

Cities around the country are considering following the lead of Berkeley, California, which became the first city to ban the installation of natural gas lines in new homes this summer.

Read More Show Less
Rebecca Burgess came up with the idea of a fibersheds project to develop an eco-friendly, locally sourced wardrobe. Nicolás Boullosa / CC BY 2.0

By Tara Lohan

If I were to open my refrigerator, the origins of most of the food wouldn't be too much of a mystery — the milk, cheese and produce all come from relatively nearby farms. I can tell from the labels on other packaged goods if they're fair trade, non-GMO or organic.

Read More Show Less
A television crew reports on Hurricane Dorian while waves crash against the Banana River sea wall. Paul Hennessy / SOPA Images / LightRocket / Getty Images

By Mark Hertsgaard and Kyle Pope

Some good news, for a change, about climate change: When hundreds of newsrooms focus their attention on the climate crisis, all at the same time, the public conversation about the problem gets better: more prominent, more informative, more urgent.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
U.S. Senators Chris Coons (D-Del.) and Mike Braun (R-Ind.) met with Bill Gates on Nov. 7 to discuss climate change and ways to address the challenge. Senator Chris Coons

The U.S. Senate's bipartisan climate caucus started with just two members, a Republican from Indiana and a Democrat from Delaware. Now it's up to eight members after two Democrats, one Independent and three more Republicans joined the caucus last week, as The Hill reported.

Read More Show Less
EPA scientists survey aquatic life in Newport, Oregon. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing to significantly limit the use of science in agency rulemaking around public health, the The New York Times reports.

Read More Show Less
A timelapse video shows synthetic material and baby fish collected from a plankton sample from a surface slick taken off Hawaii's coast. Honolulu Star-Advertiser / YouTube screenshot

A team of researchers led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration didn't intend to study plastic pollution when they towed a tiny mesh net through the waters off Hawaii's West Coast. Instead, they wanted to learn more about the habits of larval fish.

Read More Show Less