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White House Postpones Paris Agreement Meeting ... Again

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Former U.S. Sec. of State John Kerry signs the Paris agreement with his granddaughter on his lap, April 22, 2016.

A Tuesday White House meeting on the Paris agreement has been postponed to an as-yet-unspecified later date, the White House confirmed Monday evening.


As the administration inches towards a final decision on the accord, retired senior military officers sent a letter to Sec. of State Rex Tillerson and Sec. of Defense James Mattis Monday urging them to support the deal in White House negotiations.

"Climate change poses strategically significant risks to U.S. national security, directly impacting our critical infrastructure and increasing the likelihood of humanitarian disasters, state failure and conflict," former officers and security officials wrote in the letter to Tillerson.

The Wall Street Journal reported that Condoleeza Rice also made a case for the agreement in a recent Oval Office meeting.

The business world is also mobilizing to voice their support for the agreement, which GOP heavyweights and Climate Leadership Council leaders George Shultz and Ted Halstead summarized in a New York Times op-ed.

They said:

The president's Paris verdict will ultimately be about more than climate. It also carries major implications for America's place in the geoeconomic order. Staying in Paris would advance the president's priorities not only by creating jobs, but also by leveling the playing field in trade. American companies are well positioned to benefit from growing global markets in clean technologies, generating domestic jobs and growth.

Several denier-led groups also sent a letter on Monday to Trump in favor of exiting the deal.

For a deeper dive:

Meeting: AP, Politico, Washington Examiner Military: Bloomberg DC support: WSJ, Politico Pro Conservative groups: Washington Examiner, The Hill

Commentary: New York Times, George Shultz and Ted Halstead op-ed, Washington Post, Todd Stern op-ed, The Hill, Harry Alford op-ed

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