Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

New Study Showing Ozone Recovery Hailed as Model for Tackling Climate Crisis

Climate

By Jake Johnson

Hailed as an example of how concerted global action can help solve a planetary crisis, a new study conducted by NASA scientists documented the first direct evidence that an international effort to ban chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) has led to the recovery of the Antarctic ozone hole.


Published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters on Thursday, the study uses satellite observations to demonstrate that the decline in atmospheric chlorine that resulted from the implementation of the Montreal Protocol, enacted in 1989, has led to "about 20 percent less ozone depletion during the Antarctic winter than there was in 2005—the first year that measurements of chlorine and ozone during the Antarctic winter were made by NASA's Aura satellite."

"We see very clearly that chlorine from CFCs is going down in the ozone hole, and that less ozone depletion is occurring because of it," Susan Strahan, an atmospheric scientist from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and one of the study's lead authors, said in a statement.

In a video (above) published on NASA's website on Thursday, Strahan explained the significance of the study and why the Montreal Protocol should be celebrated as a great success.

While CFCs and other ozone-depleting substances were phased out by the mid-1990s, the study notes that the Antarctic ozone hole—which was first discovered in 1985—"is healing slowly" because the man-made substances that caused the hole in the first place "have long lifetimes."

Given that fact, researchers believe that it could be several decades before the ozone hole is eliminated altogether.

"CFCs have lifetimes from 50 to 100 years, so they linger in the atmosphere for a very long time," noted Anne Douglass, an atmospheric scientist at Goddard's Space Flight Center and one of the study's co-authors. "As far as the ozone hole being gone, we're looking at 2060 or 2080. And even then there might still be a small hole."

Responding to the study's results on Twitter, Greenpeace called for the success of Montreal Protocol to be used as a model for tackling the climate crisis.

"We've stopped harmful pollutants before and nature has healed itself," the group observed. "Let's cut carbon emissions now and allow nature to heal itself again."

Reposted with permission from our media associate Common Dreams.

A hiker looking up at a Redwood tree in Redwoods State Park. Rich Wheater / Getty Images
By Douglas Broom
  • Redwoods are the world's tallest trees.
  • Now scientists have discovered they are even bigger than we thought.
  • Using laser technology they map the 80-meter giants.
  • Trees are a key plank in the fight against climate change.

They are among the largest trees in the world, descendants of forests where dinosaurs roamed.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A female condor above the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge in Ventura County, California. Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

One environmental downside to wind turbines is their impact on birds.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Kentucky received record-breaking rainfall and flooding this past weekend. Keith Getter / Getty Images

Kentucky is coping with historic flooding after a weekend of record-breaking rainfall, enduring water rescues, evacuations and emergency declarations.

Read More Show Less
The Forest Vixen's CC Photo Stream. Flickr / CC BY 2.0

Spring is coming. And soon, tree swallows will start building nests. But as the climate changes, the birds are nesting earlier in the spring.

Read More Show Less
An Exxon oil refinery is seen at night. Jim Sugar / Getty Images

Citigroup will strive to reach net-zero greenhouse gas pollution across its lending portfolio by 2050 and in its own operations by 2030, the investment group announced Monday.

Read More Show Less