Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Open Source Seeds: A Threat to Monsanto

Food

By Maureen Wise

If you are a member of your local garden club, you know that a community of like-minded green thumbs is better than just being alone with your bean poles. Community and new ideas aid any process, including growing plants from seed.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Computer programmers are also a gregarious bunch, especially the open source gurus. A well-known open source project is Mozilla's Firefox web browser. The code for Firefox is free to tinker with and improve upon in the computer programmer community. This is not the case with, for example, Microsoft's closed code Internet Explorer or with most seeds planted by farmers in the U.S. that are bought from Big Ag businesses like Monsanto.

Now the garden clubs have their own open source stock to dabble with outside of Monsanto's stipulations. The Open Source Seed Initiative (OSSI) just released their first sale of 29 open source seed varieties on April 17. OSSI is offering newly bred variations of zucchini, barley, kale, lettuce, mustard, carrot, celery, quinoa, squash, peppers and more. All of these seeds are free of restrictions and patents.

Founded in 2011 in and around the University of Wisconsin-Madison by genetic scientists, sociologists and food advocates, OSSI intends to “free the seed." These freed seeds are very different than most seeds planted to grow our nation's crops. Nearly all American grown corn and soybean seeds are altered—genetically modified—to be more drought and pest resistant, and therefore are patented. They are bred and sold by Monsanto, Dupont Pioneer and other farming and biotech giants with a monopoly on seeds. Farmers are not allowed to save such restricted seeds for use the following year. They can not even share seeds with their fellow farmers. It's a controversial subject that has foodies, farmers, environmentalists and geneticists concerned about the future of seeds, the food produced and what it means for diversity in the ecosystem.

“These [new varieties of] vegetables are part of our common cultural heritage, and our goal is to make sure these seeds remain in the public domain for people to use in the future," said Professor Irwin Goldman, one of OSSI's founders and University of Wisconsin-Madison horticulture department chair. The new seed varieties shared through the OSSI project won't change the way industrial farms operate or where they obtain their seeds any time soon, but it is a big first step.

Photo credit: Adam Hirsch, Wisconsin Public Radio

If you purchase a pack of the open source seeds, not only will you be supporting this seed movement that threatens the biotech giants—you know, the Microsofts of seed breeders—you'll also be joining a huge gardening club. Your purchase is an agreement that you won't legally restrict the seeds or their produce in any way. You are encouraged to improve them, cross pollinate as early geneticist Gregor Mendel did in the mid 1800s, get back to gardening's roots and to share among your garden club.

Correction: The previous byline listed was inaccurate. The byline has been updated.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Michael Svoboda

The enduring pandemic will make conventional forms of travel difficult if not impossible this summer. As a result, many will consider virtual alternatives for their vacations, including one of the oldest forms of virtual reality – books.

Read More Show Less
Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility on Thursday accused NOAA of ignoring its own scientists' findings about the endangerment of the North Atlantic right whale. Lauren Packard / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Julia Conley

As the North Atlantic right whale was placed on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's list of critically endangered species Thursday, environmental protection groups accusing the U.S. government of bowing to fishing and fossil fuel industry pressure to downplay the threat and failing to enact common-sense restrictions to protect the animals.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Beth Ann Mayer

Since even moderate-intensity workouts offer a slew of benefits, walking is a good choice for people looking to stay healthy.

Read More Show Less
Much of Eastern Oklahoma, including most of Tulsa, remains an Indian reservation, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday. JustTulsa / CC BY 2.0

Much of Eastern Oklahoma, including most of Tulsa, remains an Indian reservation, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday.

Read More Show Less
The Firefly Watch project is among the options for aspiring citizen scientists to join. Mike Lewinski / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 2.0

By Tiffany Means

Summer and fall are great seasons to enjoy the outdoors. But if you're already spending extra time outside because of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may be out of ideas on how to make fresh-air activities feel special. Here are a few suggestions to keep both adults and children entertained and educated in the months ahead, many of which can be done from the comfort of one's home or backyard.

Read More Show Less
People sit at the bar of a restaurant in Austin, Texas, on June 26, 2020. Texas Governor Greg Abbott ordered bars to be closed by noon on June 26 and for restaurants to be reduced to 50% occupancy. Coronavirus cases in Texas spiked after being one of the first states to begin reopening. SERGIO FLORES / AFP via Getty Images

The coronavirus may linger in the air in crowded indoor spaces, spreading from one person to the next, the World Health Organization acknowledged on Thursday, as The New York Times reported. The announcement came just days after 239 scientists wrote a letter urging the WHO to consider that the novel coronavirus is lingering in indoor spaces and infecting people, as EcoWatch reported.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A never-before-documented frog species has been discovered in the Peruvian highlands and named Phrynopus remotum. Germán Chávez

By Angela Nicoletti

The eastern slopes of the Andes Mountains in central Perú are among the most remote places in the world.

Read More Show Less