Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

One of the World's Largest Hospitality Chains to Grow Its Own Vegetables at 1,000 Hotels

Food

In an attempt to eliminate 30 percent of its food waste by 2020, AccorHotels has announced plans to grow vegetables at 1,000 of its hotels.

The Novotel at Auckland Airport, New Zealand. Photo credit: Chris McLennan/AccorHotels

The Paris-based AccorHotels is one of the world's largest hospitality groups. It operates and franchises roughly 3,900 hotels in 92 countries, including the Pullman, Sofitel, Novotel, Mercure and Ibis chains.

The hotel chain's larger goal is to cut food waste to zero and to serve sustainable food as a whole.

"As we serve 200 million meals a year, we will be focusing particularly on offering healthy and responsible dishes, and on stemming food waste in our restaurants," CEO Sebastien Bazin said in a statement.

Agence France-Presse (AFP) also quoted Bazin saying on Tuesday that he intends to cut food waste by a third "in particular by sourcing food locally.”

Under its new Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) commitments, AccorHotels has outlined the following actions the group will take by 2020:

  • 30 percent less food waste
  • 100 percent low-carbon new buildings and renovations for its owned and leased properties
  • 1,000 urban vegetable gardens in its hotels

According to AFP, the company will first need to work out exactly how much food is going to waste by having its restaurants weigh and record how much food is being thrown away.

Amir Nahai, who leads Accor’s food operations, told the news publication that the company will trim down menus that offer more than 40 main courses.

“In the future we’re going to have menus with 10, 15 or 20 main courses, with more local products,” Nahai said.

The new initiatives are part of AccorHotels's "Planet 21" sustainable development program that kicked off in 2012.

In the video below, the company describes a number of ways in which they'll cut waste, from recycling orange peels to make marmalade to recycling used soap and redistributing them to communities in need.

The company also plans to improve the energy efficiency in its buildings with the ultimate aim of making them carbon neutral.

"In the wake of the 21st conference on climate change, we took the lessons we had learned from our previous program and used them to shape our vision for 2020: Drive the change towards positive hospitality wherever we are," Bazin said in a statement.

"This new five-year plan is our way of encouraging the hospitality business to do more about curbing its impacts and of inspiring a new model that brings about enduring changes."

The AFP reported that in its previous five-year environmental plan, AccorHotels reported it had cut water consumption by nearly 9 percent, energy consumption by 5.3 percent and carbon emissions by 6.2 percent.

Solar panels on the Ibis Styles Troyes Centre in France. Photo credit: Philippe Wang/AccorHotels

Each year, one-third of the world’s food is wasted after it has been harvested. That's 1.3 billion tonnes annually. Considering how many people in the world are starving, this isn't just a giant waste, it's also a huge detriment to people and the planet.

study from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research found that food waste could account for about a tenth of global greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

“Agriculture is a major driver of climate change, accounting for more than 20 percent of overall global greenhouse-gas emissions in 2010,” Prajal Pradhan, one of the study’s authors, said in a statement. “Avoiding food loss and waste would therefore avoid unnecessary greenhouse-gas emissions and help mitigate climate change.”

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Costco Lends Money to Farmer to Buy More Land to Meet Growing Demand for Organics

3 Solar Ovens That Give You the Power to Cook With the Sun

World’s First Plastic Fishing Company Wants to Rid the Oceans of Plastic Pollution

Elon Musk Unveils Tesla Model 3: Accelerating Sustainable Transport Is ‘Important for the Future of the World’

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Refrigerated trucks function as temporary morgues at the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal on May 06, 2020 in New York City. As of July, the states where COVID-19 cases are rising are mostly in the West and South. Justin Heiman / Getty Images

The official number of people in the U.S. who have lost their lives to the new coronavirus has now passed 130,000, according to tallies from The New York Times, Reuters and Johns Hopkins University.

Read More Show Less
A man walks on pink snow at the Presena glacier near Pellizzano, Italy on July 4, 2020. MIGUEL MEDINA / AFP via Getty Images

In a troubling sign for the future of the Italian Alps, the snow and ice in a glacier is turning pink due to the growth of snow-melting algae, according to scientists studying the pink ice phenomenon, as CNN reported.

Read More Show Less
Climate activist Greta Thunberg discusses EU plans to tackle the climate emergency with Parliament's environment committee on March 4, 2020. CC-BY-4.0: © European Union 2020 – Source: EP

By Abdullahi Alim

The 2008 financial crisis spurred a number of youth movements including Occupy Wall Street and the Arab Spring. A decade later, this anger resurfaced in a new wave of global protests, from Hong Kong to Beirut to London, only this time driven by the children of the 2008 financial crisis.

Read More Show Less
A climate activist holds a victory sign in Washington, DC. after President Obama announced that he would reject the Keystone XL Pipeline proposal on November 6, 2015. Mark Wilson / Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

The Supreme Court late Monday upheld a federal judge's rejection of a crucial permit for Keystone XL and blocked the Trump administration's attempt to greenlight construction of the 1,200-mile crude oil project, the third such blow to the fossil fuel industry in a day—coming just hours after the cancellation of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline and the court-ordered shutdown of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Read More Show Less
A forest fire in Yakutsk in eastern Siberia on June 2, 2020. Yevgeny Sofroneyev / TASS via Getty Images

Once thought too frozen to burn, Siberia is now on fire and spewing carbon after enduring its warmest June ever, according to CNN.

Read More Show Less
The Colima fir tree's distribution has been reduced to the area surrounding the Nevado de Colima volcano. Agustín del Castillo

By Agustín del Castillo

For 20 years, the Colima fir tree (Abies colimensis) has been at the heart of many disputes to conserve the temperate forests of southern Jalisco, a state in central Mexico. Today, the future of this tree rests upon whether the area's avocado crops will advance further and whether neighboring communities will unite to protect it.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Independent environmental certifications offer a better indicator of a product's eco credentials, including labor conditions for workers involved in production. Flickr / CC by 2.0

By Jeanette Cwienk

This summer's high street fashions have more in common than styles and colors. From the pink puff-sleeved dream going for just €19.99 ($22.52) at H&M, to Zara's elegant €12.95 ($14.63) halter-neck dress, clothing stores are alive with cheap organic cotton.

"Sustainable" collections with aspirational own-brand names like C&A's "Wear the change," Zara's "join life" or H&M's "CONSCIOUS" are offering cheap fashion and a clean environmental conscience. Such, at least, is the message. But is it really that simple?

Read More Show Less