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Olympic Athletes: We Must Not Break the 1.5C Record

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Several athletes participating in the Rio Olympics are encouraging countries to take urgent climate action in a new campaign.

Brazilian surfers, footballers and water polo players as well as athletes from some of the most vulnerable countries such as the Marshall Islands, Afghanistan and South Sudan have been speaking up for the campaign: "1.5C: The record we must not break."

Environmental concerns have mired the Rio Olympics after Guanabara Bay, where several water sport events are scheduled to be held, was found to be heavily contaminated by pollution. The risk of contracting Zika in Rio—exacerbated by climate change—has also been a major concern for athletes.

For a deeper dive: Climate Home, Wall Street Journal, Deutsche Welle, LA Times

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