Quantcast

Ohio Native Katie Spotz Visits Kenya

Aqua Clara International

by Betty Weibel

This fall, Katie Spotz, who set a world record in March 2010 as the youngest person to row solo across the Atlantic Ocean in 70 days, embarked on another adventure to Kenya. Named one of Glamour magazine’s Women of the Year in 2010, Spotz raised more than $150,000 and increased global awareness of the lack of clean drinking water for millions of people during her 3,038-mile Atlantic Ocean row and a team bicycle race across America in June 2011.

On her journey to Kisii, Kenya, she’ll see firsthand how funds she raised are helping to provide safe drinking water to 5,000 individuals and families in that rural community. During the month-long trip, the Mentor, Ohio native will spend time with Aqua Clara International (ACI), a nonprofit organization that provides the technology and training to help provide safe, affordable drinking water for families and individuals who subsist on less than $2 per day.

Spotz will participate in constructing Aqua Clara’s first community-sized water treatment system alongside local people and ACI staff. During her visit she will also assist in building a rainwater tank for a local school. The Kenya trip will also include visiting households that have purchased locally constructed water filters. In addition to providing access to safe drinking water, Spotz will see how rain water harvesting, school based water and hygiene clubs, and innovative ecological sanitation solutions are making a difference to the health of school children and communities in Kenya.

“I want to see for myself, and ultimately, be able to share with contributors, how the donations are making a difference in people’s lives,” Spotz said. “For every $30 donated, there’s someone who will be able to enjoy safe drinking water for life. That’s a pretty amazing return on investment.”

During her visit, Spotz will see local students participate in Aqua Clara Water and Hygiene Club activities. Students from local schools will participate in competitions and put on short dramas, sing songs and receive prizes to promote topics such as hand washing and water treatment. These simple messages can make a huge improvement in the health of surrounding communities.

For more information, visit www.aquaclara.org.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Ryan Hagerty / USFWS

It's become a familiar story with the Trump administration: Scientists write a report that shows the administration's policies will cause environmental damage, then the administration buries the report and fires the scientists.

Read More Show Less
Valerie / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

A coalition of some of the largest environmental groups in the country joined forces to file a lawsuit in federal court challenging the Trump administration's maneuver to weaken the Endangered Species Act.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
beyond foto / Getty Images

By Kimberly Holland

Children who eat a lot of gluten in their earliest years may have an increased risk of developing celiac disease and gluten intolerance, according to a new study published in JAMATrusted Source.

Read More Show Less
Joe Raedle / Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

Calling the global climate crisis both the greatest threat facing the U.S. and the greatest opportunity for transformative change, Sen. Bernie Sanders unveiled today a comprehensive Green New Deal proposal that would transition the U.S. economy to 100 percent renewable energy and create 20 million well-paying union jobs over a decade.

Read More Show Less
orientalizing / Flickr

The Parties to CITES agreed to list giraffes on Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) today at the World Wildlife Conference or CoP18 in Geneva. Such protections will ensure that all giraffe parts trade were legally acquired and not sourced from the poached giraffes trade and will require countries to make non-detriment findings before allowing giraffe exports. The listing will also enable the collection of international trade data for giraffes that might justify greater protections at both CITES and other venues in the future.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

The WHO stressed that more research is needed on the potential health risks of microplastic ingestion. luchschen / iStock / Getty Images Plus

The UN's health agency on Thursday said that microplastics contained in drinking water posed a "low" risk at their current levels.

However, the World Health Organization (WHO) — in its first report on the potential health risks of microplastic ingestion — also stressed more research was needed to reassure consumers.

Read More Show Less

Brazil's right-wing President Jair Bolsonaro is giving President Trump a run for his money in the alternative facts department.

Read More Show Less
Washington Gov. Jay Inslee delivered his 2019 State of the State address on Jan. 15. Governor Jay and First Lady Trudi Inslee / Flickr

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, who made solving the climate crisis the center of his presidential campaign, is dropping out of the 2020 Democratic primary race.

Read More Show Less