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OEFFA Announces 2012 Stewardship Award Recipients

Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association

The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA) has bestowed its highest honor, the Stewardship Award, to Doug Seibert and Leslie Garcia of Greene County. The announcement was made on Feb. 18 as part of OEFFA’s 33rd annual conference, Sowing the Seeds of Our Food Sovereignty. The award recognizes “outstanding contributions to the sustainable agriculture community.”

Doug and Leslie have farmed organically at Peach Mountain Organics since 1992, growing certified organic mixed vegetables, microgreens, fresh-cut flowers, mushrooms, hay and greenhouse plants. They sell their products at the Yellow Springs Farmers’ Market, local restaurants and grocery and health food stores.

The Greene County-based Peach Mountain Organics currently has two farm sites and one half acre greenhouse location in Spring Valley, Ohio. Altogether, the operation is 43 acres, more than 25 of which are certified organic.

"Leslie and Doug's energy and skill with commercial-scale, organic growing is an inspiration for many of us,” said Steve Edwards, who serves on OEFFA’s board of trustees and presented the award at the Saturday
evening ceremony. “Their willingness to share their experiences with other growers has helped provide healthy food for people beyond Peach Mountain's customers. They make it happen in the real world with an artful
balance of intelligence and hard work."

Doug and Leslie have helped organize group seed and potato orders for other farmers and grown organic bedding plants for other growers, hosted farm tours, presented OEFFA conference workshops and were involved in the creation of both OEFFA and the Federation of Ohio River Cooperatives (FORC).

“Both Doug and Leslie care deeply about creating a sustainable food system. We should all be sincerely grateful for what they have done to advance sustainable agriculture in our community,” said OEFFA Executive Director Carol Goland.

For more information and to see a full list of past Stewardship Award winners, click here.

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The Ohio Ecological Food & Farm Association (OEFFA) is a non-profit organization founded in 1979 by farmers, gardeners and conscientious eaters who committed to work together to create and promote a sustainable and healthful food and farming system. For more information, visit www.oeffa.org.

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