Quantcast

Oceana Applauds Senate Rejection of Expanded Offshore Drilling

Energy

Oceana

Oceana is relieved that the Senate voted to block the rapid and reckless expansion of offshore drilling proposed by Sen. David Vitter (R-LA). The amendment to the transportation bill failed 46—52. Oceana released the following statement from senior campaign director Jackie Savitz:

“It is encouraging that the majority of the Senate has not been duped by the oil and gas industry’s rhetoric. We simply cannot drill our way to low gas prices. The few places on our coasts that remain protected from drilling would not yield enough oil to lower gas prices. Even if that oil is produced, it would flow right into the global market—the oil industry is not offering us a local discount.

"The oil and gas industry is booming in the U.S. In 2011, U.S. oil production reached its highest levels since 2003, yet prices continue to soar. Big oil companies are among the richest companies in the world. U.S. Energy policy allows that to be the case without having to sacrifice more of our coasts to oil production.

"Since the Deepwater Horizon Disaster, Congress has not passed a single law to improve offshore drilling safety, yet it continues to take vote after vote to expand offshore drilling into new, ecologically sensitive areas. It is time we took a step back and acknowledged how absurd this conversation has become. If we are serious about lowering the cost of energy, we need to improve efficiency, electrify our fleet, and transition to renewable sources like offshore wind.”

For more information, click here.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Insects play a vital role in ecosystems and humans are particularly dependent on them for food. Dmitry Grigoriev / Unsplash

By Ajit Niranjan

Seven 'no-regret' actions could rescue insects on the road to extinction, a new roadmap for conservation says, helping ecosystems even where a lack of research means scientists cannot prove benefits to individual species.

Read More
Visitors to the Hollywood & Highland mall in Hollywood wear face masks on Jan. 27 . Five people in the U.S. have tested positive for the deadly strain of Coronavirus, one each in Washington, Illinois and Arizona, and two in Southern California, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ROBYN BECK / AFP / Getty Images

As a new coronavirus continues to spread across the globe, concerns have emerged that Trump administration cuts to science and health agencies have hampered the U.S. ability to respond.

Read More
Sponsored
Workers evacuate the Lonja del Comercio (Commerce Market) in Havana, Cuba after an earthquake rattled the island Tuesday. ADALBERTO ROQUE / AFP via Getty Images

A 7.7 magnitude earthquake shook the Caribbean Tuesday, rattling people from Miami to Mexico.

Read More
A roller coaster on the Jersey Shore flooded after Hurricane Sandy. Photo credit: Hurricane_Sandy_New_Jersey_Pier.jpg: Master Sgt. Mark C. Olsen / U.S. Air Force / New Jersey National Guard / CC BY 2.0

New Jersey will be the first state in the U.S. to require builders to take the climate crisis into consideration before seeking permission for a project.

Read More
The Director of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Gao Fu speaks on Jan. 26 during a press briefing on studying the 2019-nCoV coronavirus and developing a vaccine to prevent it. Roman Balandin / TASS / Getty Images

Editor's note: The coronavirus that started in Wuhan has sickened more than 4,000 people and killed at least 100 in China as of Jan. 27, 2020. Thailand and Hong Kong each have reported eight confirmed cases, and five people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with the illness. People are hoping for a vaccine to slow the spread of the disease.

Read More