Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Ocean Acidification Threatens Economies and Cultures Around the World

Ocean Acidification Threatens Economies and Cultures Around the World

Ocean Conservancy intern Alexis Valauri-Orton spent the last year on a journey around the world learning about ocean acidification.

She visited marine communities most at risk from ocean acidification and saw firsthand how dire the need is for more research, guidance and infrastructure to prepare for the challenges ahead. She produced a video, shown below, to help make the stories from her recent blog posts come alive.

Valauri-Orton encourages you to watch her video and "Listen to Waiaria talk about the value of shellfish to the identity of people in New Zealand ... Watch fishermen in Peru celebrate El Dia de Pescadores ... Tag along as a shellfish farmer in Thailand hand dredges the bay in the middle of the night ... See the faces and the places that continue to drive my conviction that we have more work to do ... And share them with your friends, so we can do good on what Peter, a cod-fisherman in Norway who can trace fishing back 1,000 years in his family, said to me: 'The whole world has to know. Not only in this small place, but the whole world has to know what is happening.'"

You Might Also Like

NOAA: Ocean Acidification Rises, Marine Economy Sinks

Sea Shepherd Founder to Bill Maher: ‘If Oceans Die, We Die’

How Acidification, Overfishing and Plastics Threaten the World’s Oceans

Journalists film a protest by the environmental organization BUND at the Datteln coal-fired power plant in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany on April 23, 2020. Bernd Thissen / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Lead partners of a global consortium of news outlets that aims to improve reporting on the climate emergency released a statement on Monday urging journalists everywhere to treat their coverage of the rapidly heating planet with the same same level of urgency and intensity as they have the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Airborne microplastics are turning up in remote regions of the world, including the remote Altai mountains in Siberia. Kirill Kukhmar / TASS / Getty Images

Scientists consider plastic pollution one of the "most pressing environmental and social issues of the 21st century," but so far, microplastic research has mostly focused on the impact on rivers and oceans.

Read More Show Less
Trending
A laborer works at the site of a rare earth metals mine at Nancheng county, Jiangxi province, China on Oct. 7, 2010. Jie Zhao / Corbis via Getty Images

By Michel Penke

More than every second person in the world now has a cellphone, and manufacturers are rolling out bigger, better, slicker models all the time. Many, however, have a bloody history.

Read More Show Less
Scientists are studying barley, the key ingredient in beer. Ridofranz / Getty Images

Researchers at UC-Riverside are investigating how barley, a key ingredient in beer, survives in such a wide variety of climates with hopes of learning what exactly makes it so resilient across climates.

Read More Show Less
Air France airplanes parked at the Charles de Gaulle/Roissy airport on March 24, 2020. SAMSON / AFP via Getty Images

France moved one step closer this weekend to banning short-haul flights in an attempt to fight the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less