Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Obama, Trudeau Agree to Safeguarding Arctic, Reducing Methane Emissions

Climate
Obama, Trudeau Agree to Safeguarding Arctic, Reducing Methane Emissions

President Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau have agreed to new, coordinated measures to fight climate change, White House officials announced today.

The leaders committed to cutting methane emissions 40 to 45 percent below 2012 levels by 2025. This will require the U.S. to regulate not only proposed oil and gas projects, but also existing ventures. They also pledged to institute new Arctic initiatives, including shipping corridors with low environmental impact and new protections on marine areas. The announcement comes ahead of a meeting today on U.S.-Canada joint issues. 

For a deeper dive:

NewsReuters, Bloomberg, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, CBC News, New York TimesBusinessGreen.

CommentaryThink Progress, Jeremy Deaton and Mina Lee op-ed

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

21 Kids Take on the Feds and Big Oil in Historic Climate Lawsuit

Democratic Debate Puts Fossil Fuel Industry on Notice

Break Free: Stop Dirty Fossil Fuels, Expedite Transition to 100% Renewable Energy

It’s So Warm in Alaska Snow Has to Be Brought in by Train for Iditarod

The Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, New York, a polluted nearly 2 mile-long waterway that is an EPA Superfund site. Jonathan Macagba / Moment / Getty Images

Thousands of Superfund sites exist around the U.S., with toxic substances left open, mismanaged and dumped. Despite the high levels of toxicity at these sites, nearly 21 million people live within a mile of one of them, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
The National Weather Service station in Chatham, Massachusetts, near the edge of a cliff at the Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge. Bryce Williams / National Weather Service in Boston / Norton

A weather research station on a bluff overlooking the sea is closing down because of the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Amsterdam is one of the Netherlands' cities which already has "milieuzones," where some types of vehicles are banned. Unsplash / jennieramida

By Douglas Broom

  • If online deliveries continue with fossil-fuel trucks, emissions will increase by a third.
  • So cities in the Netherlands will allow only emission-free delivery vehicles after 2025.
  • The government is giving delivery firms cash help to buy or lease electric vehicles.
  • The bans will save 1 megaton of CO2 every year by 2030.

Cities in the Netherlands want to make their air cleaner by banning fossil fuel delivery vehicles from urban areas from 2025.

Read More Show Less
Protestors stage a demonstration against fracking in California on May 30, 2013 in San Francisco, California. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

A bill that would have banned fracking in California died in committee Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
EXTREME-PHOTOGRAPHER / E+ / Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

As world leaders prepare for this November's United Nations Climate Conference in Scotland, a new report from the Cambridge Sustainability Commission reveals that the world's wealthiest 5% were responsible for well over a third of all global emissions growth between 1990 and 2015.

Read More Show Less