Quantcast

Obama Nominates Gina McCarthy as U.S. EPA Administrator

Climate

Gina McCarthy

President Obama has announced he is nominating Gina McCarthy to lead the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). McCarthy’s track record of standing up for clean air, climate action and public health shows that we can count on her to protect our environment and communities.

The U.S. EPA provides a critical service for all Americans: it stands between our families and dangerous pollution. It issues the safeguards that require polluters to clean up their act and make our air safer to breathe, our water cleaner to drink, and our rivers and lakes healthier for swimming and fishing. In just the past few years, the EPA has issued the first-ever national limits on the mercury pollution—a potent neurotoxin—from power plants and shaped clean car standards that will make cars go twice as far on a tank of gasoline.

The agency still has much work to do, from restoring protections for our vital waterways to reducing our exposure to toxic chemicals. A strong leader at the helm of the EPA can move forward and make our communities healthier and more vibrant. McCarthy is poised to provide that kind of leadership.

Throughout her decades of public service, she has proven to be a pragmatic and inclusive defender of environmental protections. Before she joined the Obama Administration as the assistant administrator for the U.S. EPA, she served as the top environmental official for Connecticut’s Republican Governor Jodi Rell and Massachusetts’ Republican Governor Mitt Romney.

During her time in Connecticut, she helped launch the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative to curb carbon pollution from power plants in nine northeastern states. In its first three years, RGGI brought $1.6 billion in economic benefits to the region, reduced climate change pollution by six percent, saved consumers more than $1.3 billion in energy costs, and created 16,000 job-years.

“If you take a look at what's recently happened with Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative,” McCarthy recently said. “You will realize that there are tremendous opportunities to address climate change in ways that build the economy, that grow jobs, that you can articulate that make sense to every individual who works in those communities.”

McCarthy brought that awareness to the EPA. She helped follow Supreme Court rulings by proposing limits on carbon pollution from new power plants. Ordinary Americans welcomed this effort to confront climate change and the threat it poses to our homes and businesses: the EPA received three million comments in favor of the carbon standards—the most the agency has ever gotten on any topic in its history.

Congress charged the EPA with the duty of listening to the best science and reducing dangerous pollution. We can rely on McCarthy to honor that duty.

Visit EcoWatch’s AIR, WATER and BIODIVERSITY pages for more related news on this topic.

——–

 

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Bumblebees flying and pollinating a creeping thyme flower. emeliemaria / iStock / Getty Images

It pays to pollinate in Minnesota.

Read More Show Less
Aerial view of icebergs on Arctic Ocean in Greenland. Explora_2005 / iStock / Getty Images

The annual Arctic thaw has kicked off with record-setting ice melt and sea ice loss that is several weeks ahead of schedule, scientists said, as the New York Times reported.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Sled dog teams pull researchers from the Danish Meteorological Institute through meltwater on the Greenland ice sheet in early June, 2019. Danish Meteorological Institute / Steffen M. Olsen

By Jon Queally

In yet the latest shocking image depicting just how fast the world's natural systems are changing due to the global climate emergency, a photograph showing a vast expanse of melted Arctic ice in Greenland — one in which a pair of sled dog teams appear to be walking on water — has gone viral.

Read More Show Less
CAFOs often store animal waste in massive, open-air lagoons, like this one at Vanguard Farms in Chocowinity, North Carolina. Bacteria feeding on the animal waste turns the mixture a bright pink. picstever / Flickr / CC BY-ND 2.0

By Tia Schwab

It has been almost a year since Hurricane Florence slammed the Carolinas, dumping a record 30 inches of rainfall in some parts of the states. At least 52 people died, and property and economic losses reached $24 billion, with nearly $17 billion in North Carolina alone. Flood waters also killed an estimated 3.5 million chickens and 5,500 hogs.

Read More Show Less
Members of the NY Renews coalition gathered before New York lawmakers reached a deal on the Climate and Communities Protection Act. NYRenews / Twitter

By Julia Conley

Grassroots climate campaigners in New York applauded on Monday after state lawmakers reached a deal on sweeping climate legislation, paving the way for the passage of what could be some of the country's most ambitious environmental reforms.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
In this picture taken on June 4, an Indian boatman walks amid boats on the dried bed of a lake at Nalsarovar Bird Sanctuary, on the eve of World Environment Day. Sam Panthaky / AFP / Getty Images

By Julia Conley

Nearly 50 people died on Saturday in one Indian state as record-breaking heatwaves across the country have caused an increasingly desperate situation.

Read More Show Less
A man carries a poster in New York City during the second annual nationwide March For Science on April 14, 2018. Kena Betancur / Getty Images

By Will J. Grant

In an ideal world, people would look at issues with a clear focus only on the facts. But in the real world, we know that doesn't happen often.

People often look at issues through the prism of their own particular political identity — and have probably always done so.

Read More Show Less

YinYang / E+ / Getty Images

In a blow to the Trump administration, the Supreme Court ruled Monday to uphold a Virginia ban on mining uranium, Reuters reported.

Read More Show Less