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Not all Superheroes Wear Capes: Stand with Lisa

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Not all Superheroes Wear Capes: Stand with Lisa

Sierra Student Coalition and 350.org

It’s a summer of superheroes. No doubt Americans will flock to see the release of the new Batman film this weekend, just as they did to see the latest Spiderman flick earlier this month. But a youth environmental coalition is calling attention to a different kind of superhero in a new campaign; a real life champion that stands up to constant attacks from Big Polluter villains and their cronies.

While you won’t see U.S. EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson on the big screen this summer wearing a cape over spandex, the Stand with Lisa campaign is supporting Jackson’s heroic efforts to fight for public health in the face of polluting villains. Web ads will run through October to raise awareness about Lisa Jackson’s heroic efforts resulting in victories like a massive increase in the fuel efficiency standards for cars by 2020 and protecting the American people from dangerous toxic mercury pollution.

By requiring power plants to install widely available, proven pollution control technologies, Lisa Jackson’s new rule would significantly limit harmful pollutants protecting our health, our children, our environment and even stimulate our economy. Our villains, Big Polluters, are still fighting for their ability to spew tons of toxic chemicals into the air, but thousands of young people Stand with Lisa to save the public from the harmful effects of these chemical pollutants.

The coalition is lead by national environmental groups 350.org and Sierra Student Coalition, the youth arm of the Sierra Club. Representatives for these groups had this to say about Stand with Lisa:

May Boeve, executive director of 350.org, said, “A majority of Americans believe we must take action on climate change, and big polluters know it, so they're hard at work dismantling the EPA. By standing with Lisa Jackson, we can make sure to push for the transition we need."

Quentin James, national director of the Sierra Student Coalition, said, “Our society idolizes superheroes because of the values they represent: integrity, strength and determination. These attributes are rare in combination, which is the allure of these characters, but we shouldn’t forget that there are real life heroes that stand up for the average person on a daily basis. It takes courage sometimes. Lisa Jackson has the guts, and all of the above, to take a stand for a clean, healthy future for the next generation in the face of unprecedented attacks."

The ad and website launch will be followed up by a college campus tour in the fall. Further details and dates to be announced.

 Visit EcoWatch’s CLEAN AIR ACT page for more related news on this topic.

 

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