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Norway Is Banning Fur Farming

Animals

By Conor Sneyd

Norway is introducing a total ban on fur farming, according to a statement released by the Norwegian animal rights organization NOAH this weekend. The country is currently home to 300 fur farms, which breed and kill 700,000 minks and 110,000 foxes every year, so this is truly a massive victory for animals.


An exposé released by PETA in 2014 documented horrific conditions on fur farms in Norway and several other countries and featured footage captured by Norwegian groups Dyrebeskyttelsen Norge and Nettverk for Dyrs Frihet. The video shows animals suffering from starvation, thirst and untreated, bloody wounds. Many on these animals go insane as a result of their confinement, and some are driven to self-mutilation and cannibalism. Dead animals are left to rot, often among their desperate cagemates. At the end of this ordeal, the animals are killed, typically in gruesome ways including anal or vaginal electrocution.

Animal rights activists in Norway have been campaigning for a ban for years. In 2016, NOAH organized Europe's largest-ever anti-fur protest, during which more than 13,000 people marched through the streets of Oslo and other Norwegian cities. Many PETA supporters were also there to help spread the fur-free message.

Although the full details of Norway's ban have yet to be finalized, all fur farms in the country will reportedly be required to shut down by 2025.

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