Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Noam Chomsky: 'Ridicule Is Not Enough' to Defeat Trumpism

Popular
Noam Chomsky: 'Ridicule Is Not Enough' to Defeat Trumpism
Jeremy Danger / Flickr

By Alexandra Rosenmann

Noam Chomsky has a message for the resistance movement and the mainstream media alike: "Ridicule is not enough" to defeat Trumpism.

"We have to be a little cautious about not trying to kill a gnat with an atom bomb," he told George Yancy in a New York Times interview on July 5.


The political scientist and world-renowned linguist went on to praise Late Show host Stephen Colbert's recent smackdown of Republican efforts to gut the country's climate laws. Chomsky has dubbed the current GOP "the most dangerous organization in world history." For him, the question is how Democrats can recapture the White House before the planet's fate is sealed.

"It's necessary to address the concerns and beliefs of those who are taken in by the fraud, or who don't recognize the nature and significance of the issues for other reasons," he noted.

While the opposition remains fractured, talk radio "and other practitioners of alternative facts" are uniting Trump voters against a common enemy—the left.

"For the majority of the base, Trump and the more savage wing of the Republican establishment are not far from their standard attitudes," Chomsky asserted, noting that most Trump supporters "are relatively affluent."

"Three-quarters had incomes above the median," he explained. "About one-third had incomes of over $100,000 a year, and thus were in the top 15 percent of personal income, in the top 6 percent of those with only a high school education."

According to Chomsky, rebuilding the Democratic Party will largely depend on a revival of the New Deal agenda, to draw in the "industrial sector" of Trump voters.

"A segment of the Trump base comes from the industrial sector that has been cast aside for decades by both parties, often from rural areas where industry and stable jobs have collapsed," he said. "Many voted for Obama, believing his message of hope and change, but were quickly disillusioned and have turned in desperation to their bitter class enemy, clinging to the hope that somehow its formal leader will come to their rescue."

Reposted with permission from our media associate AlterNet.


An Edith's Checkerspot butterfly in Los Padres National Forest in Southern California. Patricia Marroquin / Moment / Getty Images

Butterflies across the U.S. West are disappearing, and now researchers say the climate crisis is largely to blame.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A wildfire burns in the Hollywood hills on July 19, 2016 in Hollywood, California. AaronP / Bauer-Griffin / GC Images

California faces another "critically dry year" according to state officials, and a destructive wildfire season looms on its horizon. But in a state that welcomes innovation, water efficacy approaches and drought management could replenish California, increasingly threatened by the climate's new extremes.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Wisdom is seen with her chick in Feb. 2021 at the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Jon Brack / Friends of Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge / Flickr / CC 2.0

Wisdom the mōlī, or Laysan albatross, is the oldest wild bird known to science at the age of at least 70. She is also, as of February 1, a new mother.

Read More Show Less
Wind turbines in Norway. piola66 / E+ / Getty Images

By Hui Hu

Winter is supposed to be the best season for wind power – the winds are stronger, and since air density increases as the temperature drops, more force is pushing on the blades. But winter also comes with a problem: freezing weather.

Read More Show Less
Jaffa Port in Israel. theDOCK innovated the Israeli maritime space and kickstarted a boom in new technologies. Pixabay

While traditional investment in the ocean technology sector has been tentative, growth in Israeli maritime innovations has been exponential in the last few years, and environmental concern has come to the forefront.

Read More Show Less