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Noam Chomsky: Climate Change and Nuclear War, Most Dangerous Threats to the Human Species

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Noam Chomsky: Climate Change and Nuclear War, Most Dangerous Threats to the Human Species

Democracy Now! celebrated its 20th anniversary Monday night at the historic Riverside Church in New York City. Among those who addressed more than 2,000 attendants was world-renowned linguistic Noam Chomsky.


Chomsky spoke about the two most dangerous threats the human species faces today: the possibility of nuclear war and the accelerating destruction of human-fueled climate change. Chomsky also addressed the dangers of Donald Trump's climate change denialism—and what it means for the future of the human species.

Watch the video clips below:

Reposted with permission from our media associate Democracy Now!.

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