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NO COAL EXPORTS: Tell the Corps of Engineers to Analyze all Impacts of the Gateway Pacific Coal Terminal

Energy

Waterkeeper Alliance

Join the movement to protect the environment and our communities from the devastating impacts of coal mining, transport and export. Sign this petition to tell the Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE), State of Washington and Whatcom County to conduct a full Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that analyzes all the "cumulative impacts" of export terminals on communities where the coal will be mined, transported, shipped and burned.

Signing this petition sends an email directly to the State of Washington hearing officer for the Gateway Pacific Coal Terminal. The public comment period for the Gateway Pacific coal terminal EIS scoping process is open until Jan. 22. The ACOE is trying to improperly narrow the scope of the EIS process for this proposal to construct North America’s largest coal export terminal.

This petition unites the voices of people across the globe who demand U.S. leaders take seriously the threat posed by the trafficking of coal. It will show a broad base of authentic citizen support for a transition away from planet-killing fossil fuels to a sustainable future using renewable energy. Please join us!

 

[emailpetition id="3"]

 

Endorsing Organizations: Waterkeeper Alliance, Columbia Riverkeeper, Puget Soundkeeper, Spokane Riverkeeper, North Sound Baykeeper, Coos Waterkeeper, Lake Pend Oreille Waterkeeper, Yamuna Waterkeeper, Buriganga River Waterkeeper, Qiantang River Waterkeeper, Riverkeeper, SkyTruthWater-Culture Institute, Clean Energy Action, Valley Watch, Women In Black Vashon, Pacific Environment

If your organization is interested in endorsing this petition, email EcoWatch at spear@ecowatch.com.

Visit EcoWatch’s COAL EXPORTS page for more related news on this topic.

 

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