Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

New Yorkers to Rally Against Fracking and In Support of Renewable Energy June 17

Energy
New Yorkers to Rally Against Fracking and In Support of Renewable Energy June 17

Frack Action

On June 17, thousands of New Yorkers from across the state will attend the "NY Crossroads" rally and march against fracking and in support of renewable energy.

Over 100 co-sponsoring organizations from across the state and the nation will be represented. Speakers will include former Congressman Maurice Hinchey, Lois Gibbs, Jim Dean of Democracy for America, Mark Jacobson, Arun Gandhi, Oren Lyons and Phil Aroneanu of 350.org. Music will be performed by Pete Seeger and Natalie Merchant.

With Gov. Cuomo (D-NY) weighing whether or not to allow fracking in New York State, the NY Crossroads rally will draw attention to this pivotal moment in the state's energy future. With or without regulations in place, fracking is a menace to the environment, public health and emits greenhouse gases at disturbing levels that undermine its credentials as a bridge fuel, beneficial for the environment to avoid climate change. Gov. Cuomo has insisted that his decision would be guided by science, but his administration’s actions thus far have lacked transparency and scientific rigor.

The oil and gas industry has poured millions of dollars into New York to lobby, influence elected officials and saturate the state with pro-fracking propaganda, but grassroots opponents remain more passionate than supporters. Although the gas industry’s spokespeople and propaganda campaign assure the safety of fracking, New Yorkers are not buying it and remain opposed to fracking, while the truth is coming out that fracking is far from safe and that the gas industry cannot be trusted. A recent investigation by the Times Tribune in Pennsylvania revealed many cases of water contamination from fracking.

Following the impact of hurricanes on New York, Gov. Cuomo has vowed to lead on climate change in the wake of Superstorn Sandy, but fracking would be in stark contradiction to that promise. With the release of a study by Stanford and Cornell scientists suggesting an alternative energy future for New York powered entirely by wind, water and sunlight can be achieved by 2030, New Yorkers will be uniting in Albany to call on Gov. Cuomo to lead the nation in constructing a renewable energy economy in New York rather than continuing down the destructive path towards greater reliance on dirty, dangerous fossil fuels.

Thousands of New Yorkers with signs and props will gather at 12 p.m. on the East Capitol Lawn in Albany.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING and RENEWABLES pages for more related news on this topic.

——–

Sign the petition today, telling President Obama to enact an immediate fracking moratorium:


OlgaMiltsova / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Gwen Ranniger

In the midst of a pandemic, sales of cleaning products have skyrocketed, and many feel a need to clean more often. Knowing what to look for when purchasing cleaning supplies can help prevent unwanted and dangerous toxics from entering your home.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter


JasonOndreicka / iStock / Getty Images

Twenty-five years ago, a food called Tofurky made its debut on grocery store shelves. Since then, the tofu-based roast has become a beloved part of many vegetarians' holiday feasts.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Protestors walk past an image of a Native American woman during a march to "Count Every Vote, Protect Every Person" after the U.S. presidential Election in Seattle, Washington on November 4. Jason Redmond / AFP / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

A leading environmental advocacy group marked Native American Heritage Month on Wednesday by urging President-elect Joe Biden, Vice President-elect Kamala Kamala Harris, and the entire incoming administration "to honor Indigenous sovereignty and immediately halt the Keystone XL, Dakota Access, and Line 3 pipelines."

Read More Show Less
Marilyn Angel Wynn / Getty Images

By Christina Gish Hill

Historians know that turkey and corn were part of the first Thanksgiving, when Wampanoag peoples shared a harvest meal with the pilgrims of Plymouth plantation in Massachusetts. And traditional Native American farming practices tell us that squash and beans likely were part of that 1621 dinner too.

Read More Show Less
Former U.S. Sec. of Energy Ernest Moniz listens during the National Clean Energy Summit 9.0 on October 13, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Isaac Brekken / Getty Images for National Clean Energy Summit

By Jake Johnson

Amid reports that oil industry-friendly former Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz remains under consideration to return to his old post in the incoming Biden administration, a diverse coalition of environmental groups is mobilizing for an "all-out push" to keep Moniz away from the White House and demand a cabinet willing to boldly confront the corporations responsible for the climate emergency.

Read More Show Less