Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

New York Yankees Ready to Lead the League in Sustainability

Business

Two weeks before the New York Yankees opened their 111th baseball season, as Derek Jeter and his teammates were in Florida finishing up their spring training schedule, the Yankee’s vice president of Stadium Operations, Doug Behar, was out in California, attending a spring training session of his own.

Doug Behar, vice president of stadium operations for the New York Yankees, has become a league leader in environmental sustainability. Photo credit: Natural Resources Defense Council

Instead of exhibition games and batting practice, Doug made the cross country trek to attend an all-day course exploring the intricacies of food scrap composting and more sustainable waste management practices. And while Jeter and company were enjoying the Tampa nightlife, Doug was hanging out with me and several of my NRDC colleagues, as well as trash experts from around the nation, at the annual conference of the Solid Waste Association of North America.

This was not a glamour trip for Doug, an unpretentious gentleman with four World Series rings who is the behind-the-scenes captain of daily operations at the House that Ruth Built. Doug was at the Solid Waste Association conference for good reason—he and the team’s ownership are committed to making the Yankees major league leaders in environmental sustainability.

At the day-long organics collection course, Doug listened carefully to discussions regarding the environmental benefits of keeping food scraps and yard trimmings separate from other refuse so that these organic materials can be used for compost and to produce clean bio-gas. He learned about the equipment used to collect organics most efficiently. And he participated in conversations regarding the best ways to communicate with the public to boost participation in composting programs.

This course was hardly Doug’s first experience with environmental concepts.  For several years, the Yankees have been implementing more sustainable operations at their new stadium.

And the team’s sustainability campaign is already producing some impressive results. 

For example, Yankee Stadium:

  • is located adjacent to numerous subway lines and a new commuter rail connection, which are used by tens of thousands of fans before and after every home date and which help to slash the stadium’s per-game energy footprint;
  • uses high efficiency sports lighting, which cuts electricity costs in half;
  • buys only Energy Star appliances for stadium kitchens, restaurants and concession stands, which save 20 to 40 percent of the energy required for similar products of standard design;
  • obtains 100 percent of its power from U.S. wind farms
  • recycles paper, cardboard, glass, plastics, aluminum, food scraps, grass clippings, cooking oil, batteries, lamps and light bulbs, electronic waste, toner cartridges, carpet and furniture; and
  • donates prepared but unsold food to local food shelters after every game.

Of course, many other teams are also adopting sustainability programs at their own ball parks. Credit for this ongoing cultural shift goes to Major League Baseball Commissioner Allen “Bud” Selig and MLB’s team of senior executives who are implementing the commissioner’s environmental vision in partnership with NRDC’s Greening of Sports team: Allen HershkowitzDarby Hoover and Alice Henley.

Back in California at the solid waste conference, Behar described to me some of the sustainability practices that the Yankees have put in place over the last several years, as well as his hopes for expanding composting operations at the stadium in the months to come. He concluded: “We’re doing a lot, but we’ve still got work to do!”

Of course, that’s true. Like businesses everywhere, the Yankees sustainability record isn’t perfect.

But having having heard, first-hand, his commitment to make Yankee Stadium among the greenest in all professional sports, I can tell you this: even with the 2014 baseball season only several weeks old, Yankee VP Doug Behar is already a winner.

How is your favorite sports team doing on the sustainability front?  Check out NRDC’s Sports Greening Project.

——–

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

Major League Baseball Announces Green Glove Award Winner

How One NFL Team Will Turn Food Waste Into Renewable Energy

——–

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A protest against the name of the Washington Redskins in Minneapolis, Minnesota on Nov. 2, 2014. Fibonacci Blue / CC BY 2.0

The Washington Redskins will retire their controversial name and logo, the National Football League (NFL) team announced Monday.

Read More Show Less
The survival tools northern fish have used for millennia could be a disadvantage as environmental conditions warm and more fast-paced species move in. Istvan Banyai / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Alyssa Murdoch, Chrystal Mantyka-Pringle and Sapna Sharma

Summer has finally arrived in the northern reaches of Canada and Alaska, liberating hundreds of thousands of northern stream fish from their wintering habitats.

Read More Show Less
A mother walks her children through a fountain on a warm summer day on July 12, 2020 in Hoboken, New Jersey. Gary Hershorn / Getty Images

A heat wave that set in over the South and Southwest left much of the U.S. blanketed in record-breaking triple digit temperatures over the weekend. The widespread and intense heat wave will last for weeks, making the magnitude and duration of its heat impressive, according to The Washington Post.

Read More Show Less
If you get a call from a number you don't recognize, don't hit decline — it might be a contact tracer calling to let you know that someone you've been near has tested positive for the coronavirus. blackCAT / Getty Images

By Joni Sweet

If you get a call from a number you don't recognize, don't hit decline — it might be a contact tracer calling to let you know that someone you've been near has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Read More Show Less
Aerial view of burnt areas of the Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia state, Brazil, on Aug. 24, 2019. CARLOS FABAL / AFP via Getty Images

NASA scientists say that warmer than average surface sea temperatures in the North Atlantic raise the concern for a more active hurricane season, as well as for wildfires in the Amazon thousands of miles away, according to Newsweek.

Read More Show Less
A baby receives limited treatment at a hospital in Yemen on June 27, 2020. Mohammed Hamoud / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

Oxfam International warned Thursday that up to 12,000 people could die each day by the end of the year as a result of hunger linked to the coronavirus pandemic—a daily death toll surpassing the daily mortality rate from Covid-19 itself.

Read More Show Less

Trending

The 2006 oil spill was the largest incident in Philippine history and damaged 1,600 acres of mangrove forests. Shubert Ciencia / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Jun N. Aguirre

An oil spill on July 3 threatens a mangrove forest on the Philippine island of Guimaras, an area only just recovering from the country's largest spill in 2006.

Read More Show Less