Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

New York State Ends Religious Exemptions for Vaccines

Popular
Samara Heisz / iStock / Getty Images

New York state has joined California, West Virginia, Arizona, Mississippi and Maine in ending religious exemptions for parents who prefer not to vaccinate their children, The New York Times reported.


The bill passed both the state Assembly and Senate Thursday, and was immediately signed by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, citing a measles outbreak that has sickened 1,022 people in 28 states since January, according to the most recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data. That is the highest number of cases since measles was declared eliminated in the U.S. in 2000.

"The science is crystal clear: Vaccines are safe, effective and the best way to keep our children safe," Cuomo said in a statement reported by NPR. "While I understand and respect freedom of religion, our first job is to protect the public health and by signing this measure into law, we will help prevent further transmissions and stop this outbreak right in its tracks."

The bill will require children to be vaccinated before they can attend school, no matter their parents' religious beliefs, The Associated Press reported. It goes into effect immediately, but will give unvaccinated children entering a school 30 days to show they have received the first dose of the required immunizations.

Most of the cases in the current outbreak have been reported in ultra-Orthodox Jewish communities in Rockland, New York and parts of Brooklyn, NPR reported, adding urgency to the question of religious exemption in the state. Emotions ran high at the vote tally in the New York State Assembly, with protesters, including parents of unvaccinated children, chanting "shame on you" after the measure passed.

The bill passed the Assembly narrowly, by 77 to 53. It needed 76 votes to pass. It then cleared the Senate by 36 to 26.

Long Island attorney and father-of-three Stan Yung, who said he did not vaccinate his children because of his Russian Orthodox beliefs and because of health concerns over vaccines, said he might now leave New York.

"People came to this country to get away from exactly this kind of stuff," Yung told The Associated Press before the vote Thursday.

Supporters of the bill argued that individual religious beliefs should not come before scientific evidence, especially when public health is at stake. Many noted that there is no clear prohibition against vaccines in many religions, and that parents might be using religious belief as an excuse to mask other health concerns based on discredited warnings about the dangers of vaccines.

"I'm not aware of anything in the Torah, the Bible, the Koran or anything else that suggests you should not get vaccinated," Bronx Democrat Jeffrey Dinowitz, who sponsored the bill in the Assembly, told The Associated Press. "If you choose to not vaccinate your child, therefore potentially endangering other children ... then you're the one choosing not to send your children to school."

Manhattan Democrat Brad Hoylman, who sponsored the bill in the Senate, pointed his finger at misinformation that spreads online and falsely claims that vaccines cause autism or other conditions.

"There is a public health crisis underway and New York is the epicenter," Hoylman told The New York Times. "And numbers continue to grow because well-intentioned parents are being misinformed by anti-vax conspiracy theorists. And it's part of the state's responsibility to make sure everyone is safe in schools and day care centers."

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A mostly empty 110 freeway toward downtown Los Angeles, California on April 28, 2020. Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The shelter in place orders that brought clean skies to some of the world's most polluted cities and saw greenhouse gas emissions plummet were just a temporary relief that provided an illusory benefit to the long-term consequences of the climate crisis. According to new research, the COVID-19 lockdowns will have a "neglible" impact on global warming, as Newshub in New Zealand reported.

Read More Show Less
Centrosaurus apertus was a plant-eating, single-horned dinosaur that lived 76 to 77 million years ago. Sergey Krasovskiy / Stocktrek Images / Getty Images

Scientists have discovered and diagnosed the first instance of malignant cancer in a dinosaur, and they did so by using modern medical techniques. They published their results earlier this week in The Lancet Oncology.

Read More Show Less
Parks keep people happy in times of global crisis, economic shutdown and public anger. NPS

By Joe Roman and Taylor Ricketts

The COVID-19 pandemic in the United States is the deepest and longest period of malaise in a dozen years. Our colleagues at the University of Vermont have concluded this by analyzing posts on Twitter. The Vermont Complex Systems Center studies 50 million tweets a day, scoring the "happiness" of people's words to monitor the national mood. That mood today is at its lowest point since 2008 when they started this project.

Read More Show Less
The ubiquity of guns and bullets poses environmental risks. Contaminants in bullets include lead, copper, zinc, antimony and mercury. gorancakmazovic / iStock / Getty Images Plus

New York State Attorney General Letitia James announced Thursday that she will attempt to dismantle the National Rifle Association (NRA), arguing that years of corruption and mismanagement warrant the dissolution of the activist organization, as CNN reported.

Read More Show Less
Bystanders watch the MV Wakashio bulk carrier from which oil is leaking near Blue Bay Marine Park in southeast Mauritius, on August 6, 2020. Photo by Dev Ramkhelawon / L'Express Maurice / AFP / Getty Images

The Indian Ocean island of Mauritius, renowned for its coral reefs, is facing an unprecedented ecological catastrophe after a tanker ran aground offshore and began leaking oil.

Read More Show Less
A mural honors the medics fighting COVID-19 in Australia, where cases are once again rising, taken on April 22, 2020 in Melbourne, Australia. Robert Cianflone / Getty Images

By Gianna-Carina Grün

While the first countries are easing their lockdowns, others are reporting more and more new cases every day. Data for the global picture shows the pandemic is far from over. DW has the latest statistics.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Hannah Watters wrote on Twitter that she was suspended for posting a video and photo of crowded hallways at her high school. hannah @ihateiceman

As the debate over how and if to safely reopen schools in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic continues, two student whistleblowers have been caught in the crosshairs.

Read More Show Less