Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Slideshow: 20 New Species of 2016

Popular

By Shreya Dasgupta

Discovering a new species is always exciting—it shows that much of our world remains to be explored and described. This year, too, scientists discovered and described several new species of animals and plants, including 13 new dancing peacock spiders, a new crab that was found in a pet market, a new species of whale, a tarantula that shoots balls of barbed hair at enemies and one bird that is now 13 distinct species.

Unfortunately, many of the new species are already on the brink of extinction, threatened by poaching, wildlife trade, habitat destruction and diseases.

Below are Mongabay's picks for top new species discovered in 2016 (in no particular order). Note: for each entry, the publication and author are listed in parentheses.

1. New species of Beaked Whale (Mongabay, by Jeremy Hance)

2. Thirteen New Dancing Peacock Spiders (Mongabay, by Shreya Dasgupta, Mike Gaworecki)

3. Rare Devil’s Orchid (Mongabay, by Shreya Dasgupta)

4. Three New Species of Mouse Lemurs (Mongabay, by Mike Gaworecki)

5. Deepest Fish Species Discovered by Deep-Diving (Mongabay, by Shreya Dasgupta)

6. Silver Boa That Is “On Its Way to Extinction” (Mongabay, by Mike Gaworecki)

7. Rabbit-Like Pika (Mongabay, by Shreya Dasgupta)

8. Caribbean Plants Named After James Bond (Mongabay, by Shreya Dasgupta)

9. Giant Air-Breathing Fish (National Geographic, by Brian Clark Howard)

10. Tarantula That Shoots Balls of Barbed Hairs at Enemies (Mongabay, by Shreya Dasgupta)

11. Two Species of Magnolia Discovered Online (BBC)

12. New Scops Owl (Mongabay, by Mike Gaworecki)

13. Parasitic Orchid That Never Blooms (Mongabay, by Shreya Dasgupta)

14. Spider That Looks like the ‘Sorting Hat’ from Harry Potter (Mongabay, by Shreya Dasgupta)

15. Six New Deep-Sea Animals Discovered in Undersea Hot Springs (Mongabay, by Shreya Dasgupta)

16. Three New Miniature Salamanders Are Already Headed for Extinction (Mongabay, by Shreya Dasgupta)

17. Crab Discovered in Chinese Fish Market (Mongabay, by Shreya Dasgupta)

18. New Millipede Has 414 legs, 4 Penises (Mongabay, by Shreya Dasgupta)

19. Smallest of Giant Flowers (Mongabay, by Shreya Dasgupta)

20. One Bird That Became 13 (Motherboard, by Kaleigh Rogers)

Reposted with permission from our media associate Mongabay.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A coral reef in Egypt's Red Sea. Tropical ocean ecosystems could see sudden biodiversity losses this decade if emissions are not reduced. Georgette Douwma / Stone / Getty Images

The biodiversity loss caused by the climate crisis will be sudden and swift, and could begin before 2030.

Read More Show Less
An approximately one-year-old puma in the streets of Santiago, Chile on March 24, 2020, in search for food as fewer people are outside due to the pandemic. ANDRES PINA / ATON CHILE / AFP via Getty Images

A third cougar has been sighted wandering through a residential neighborhood in the Chilean capital of Santiago as millions of the city's residents are under lockdown measures in response to the coronavirus outbreak.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Bernie Sanders announces he is suspending his campaign via a livestream Wednesday. berniesanders.com via Getty Images

Bernie Sanders, the Independent Vermont Senator who campaigned for aggressive action on the climate crisis and environmental justice, has dropped out of the 2020 Democratic primary race.

Read More Show Less
The Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, Louisiana has been converted to a 1,000-bed field hospital for coronavirus patients to alleviate stress on local hospitals. Chris Graythen / Getty Images

An area in Louisiana whose predominantly black and brown residents are hard-hit by health problems from industry overdevelopment is experiencing one of the highest death rates from coronavirus of any county in the United States.

Read More Show Less
A woman lies in bed with the flu. marka/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

A central player in the fight against the novel coronavirus is our immune system. It protects us against the invader and can even be helpful for its therapy. But sometimes it can turn against us.

Read More Show Less