Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

New Keystone XL Comedy Video Challenges Industry Claims

Energy
New Keystone XL Comedy Video Challenges Industry Claims

Today, on the first day of the State Department’s public comment period for the recently released environmental impact report on the Keystone XL pipeline, acclaimed comedians and climate justice advocates team up to release a provocative new video blasting the pipeline's impact on jobs and the environment.

Combining environmental justice politics with hilarious satire straight out of the Daily Show, the comedy video, Keystone XL Has a Job for You!, is the brainchild of Movement Generation. Written by and starring Josh Healey and Donte Clark, the video is a comedic twist on one of today's most serious environmental issues: the Keystone XL pipeline. The Keystone XL and tar sands production threatens people's health, water and air across North America, especially in indigenous and working class communities and communities of color.

"This video is our public comment on Keystone XL," said Mateo Nube, co-director of Movement Generation. "If President Obama's State Department is going to repeat the fictitious lies of the extreme energy industry, then we are going to use fictitious humor to tell the truth."

In particular, the video dismantles the false division between a strong economy and a clean environment. The oil industry claims that the Keystone XL pipeline would create thousands of jobs. But in a project fueling so many environmental and health risks, what types of jobs would it really create? Keystone XL has a Job for You! answers that question through outrageous satire.

"Some people might be offended by the video," said Healey. "But all the crazy things we say—making money off cancer victims, shredding Native American treaties—are what corporate projects like Keystone XL are really doing. We just took it to its logistical, ridiculous conclusion."

The video doesn't just confront the problem—it also offers solutions. In real life, four of the actors represent unions and community organizations that are creating green jobs and building alternatives to the extreme energy industry. These groups are building resistance and resilience in Richmond, CA, (the refinery-impacted city where the video is set) and beyond.

In addition, Movement Generation is using the video to amplify the Our Power Campaign, a national grassroots effort to create millions of climate jobs—jobs that meet people’s needs while caring for natural resources and ecosystems.

"Around the country, communities are rising up for a just transition away from the extreme energy industry," said Nube. "Keystone XL represents the failed corporate policies of the past. Hopefully this video can point us towards the clean, fair economy of the future."

Visit EcoWatch’s KEYSTONE XL page for more related news on this topic.


OlgaMiltsova / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Gwen Ranniger

In the midst of a pandemic, sales of cleaning products have skyrocketed, and many feel a need to clean more often. Knowing what to look for when purchasing cleaning supplies can help prevent unwanted and dangerous toxics from entering your home.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter


JasonOndreicka / iStock / Getty Images

Twenty-five years ago, a food called Tofurky made its debut on grocery store shelves. Since then, the tofu-based roast has become a beloved part of many vegetarians' holiday feasts.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Protestors walk past an image of a Native American woman during a march to "Count Every Vote, Protect Every Person" after the U.S. presidential Election in Seattle, Washington on November 4. Jason Redmond / AFP / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

A leading environmental advocacy group marked Native American Heritage Month on Wednesday by urging President-elect Joe Biden, Vice President-elect Kamala Kamala Harris, and the entire incoming administration "to honor Indigenous sovereignty and immediately halt the Keystone XL, Dakota Access, and Line 3 pipelines."

Read More Show Less
Marilyn Angel Wynn / Getty Images

By Christina Gish Hill

Historians know that turkey and corn were part of the first Thanksgiving, when Wampanoag peoples shared a harvest meal with the pilgrims of Plymouth plantation in Massachusetts. And traditional Native American farming practices tell us that squash and beans likely were part of that 1621 dinner too.

Read More Show Less
Former U.S. Sec. of Energy Ernest Moniz listens during the National Clean Energy Summit 9.0 on October 13, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Isaac Brekken / Getty Images for National Clean Energy Summit

By Jake Johnson

Amid reports that oil industry-friendly former Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz remains under consideration to return to his old post in the incoming Biden administration, a diverse coalition of environmental groups is mobilizing for an "all-out push" to keep Moniz away from the White House and demand a cabinet willing to boldly confront the corporations responsible for the climate emergency.

Read More Show Less