Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

New Documentary Follows Two Boys Fighting Big Oil Over Ecuadorian Rainforest Destruction

Energy
New Documentary Follows Two Boys Fighting Big Oil Over Ecuadorian Rainforest Destruction

The South American country of Ecuador may not be on many people's radars. But a large-scale disaster with ongoing health and environmental impacts occurred there that's been dubbed a "rainforest Chernobyl."

Filmmakers Francine Strickwerda and Laurel Spellman Smith have made a new documentary Oil & Water telling the story of two teenagers—one American, one Ecuadorian—fighting to restore the country's rainforests and seeking justice for the indigenous peoples damaged by the effects of oil exploration and drilling. It depicts the challenges faced by the young men and their allies as they fight the power of a Big Oil company, Texaco (now Chevron), that for 28 years poisoned drinking water, destroyed the landscape and pushed the indigenous people to the edges of their lands as it drilled for oil.

David Poritz learned about what was happening in Ecuador when he was a sixth grader in Massachusetts and immediately began his work to fight back. Hugo Lucitante was sent at age 10 from Ecuador to Seattle by his tribe to be educated, hopeful that he would return as a tribal leader. He met Poritz while he was in Ecuador touring the health impacts of massive dumps of oil sludge and toxic wastewater into the Amazon basin. The two joined together to raise international awareness of the situation and spur action.

The filmmakers learned about Lucitante from a news article about his graduation from a Seattle high school. Looking into his background, they found out about the oil drilling affecting his tribal lands. They later learned about Poritz and his involvement in a legal case against Chevron.

"We saw many parallels in Hugo and David’s stories," said the filmmakers. "Here were two boys, each with a mythic backstory, who almost seemed to have traded places in the universe. They were taking on a Goliath of our times. Hugo and David were both deeply affected by what had happened in Ecuador, and we wondered if we could tell the story of the disaster through their experience."

National Public Radio's Here & Now talked with the filmmakers about the project. Listen below:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Oil Spills Increased by 17% in 2013

Chevron Hides Evidence That Proves Guilt in Ecuador Rainforest Contamination Case

Chevron Sues Rainforest Communities It Contaminated

A 3-hour special film by EarthxTV calls for protection of the Amazon and its indigenous populations. EarthxTV.org

To save the planet, we must save the Amazon rainforest. To save the rainforest, we must save its indigenous peoples. And to do that, we must demarcate their land.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres delivers a video speech at the high-level meeting of the 46th session of the United Nations Human Rights Council UNHRC in Geneva, Switzerland on Feb. 22, 2021. Xinhua / Zhang Cheng via Getty Images

By Anke Rasper

"Today's interim report from the UNFCCC is a red alert for our planet," said UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres.

The report, released Friday, looks at the national climate efforts of 75 states that have already submitted their updated "nationally determined contributions," or NDCs. The countries included in the report are responsible for about 30% of the world's global greenhouse gas emissions.

Read More Show Less

Trending

New Delhi's smog is particularly thick, increasing the risk of vehicle accidents. SAJJAD HUSSAIN / AFP via Getty Images

India's New Delhi has been called the "world air pollution capital" for its high concentrations of particulate matter that make it harder for its residents to breathe and see. But one thing has puzzled scientists, according to The Guardian. Why does New Delhi see more blinding smogs than other polluted Asian cities, such as Beijing?

Read More Show Less
A bridge over the Delaware river connects New Hope, Pennsylvania with Lambertville, New Jersey. Richard T. Nowitz / Getty Images

In a historic move, the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) voted Thursday to ban hydraulic fracking in the region. The ban was supported by all four basin states — New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania and New York — putting a permanent end to hydraulic fracking for natural gas along the 13,539-square-mile basin, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.

Read More Show Less
Woodpecker

Colombia is one of the world's largest producers of coffee, and yet also one of the most economically disadvantaged. According to research by the national statistic center DANE, 35% of the population in Columbia lives in monetary poverty, compared to an estimated 11% in the U.S., according to census data. This has led to a housing insecurity issue throughout the country, one which construction company Woodpecker is working hard to solve.

Read More Show Less